polishing a windscreen


Technical information and Q&A applicable to all years and models of Goldwings
  • Sponsored Links
User avatar
PastoT
Posts: 420
Joined: Sun Jul 01, 2012 9:20 pm
Location: Mt Home, Idaho
Motorcycle: 2002 GL1800 (128k)

Re: polishing a windscreen

Post by PastoT » Wed Jun 20, 2018 7:56 pm



I'd be hesitant but if you go to a plastic supply house I'll bet they suggest novus polishes. I use the Novus 1 2 & 3 treatment of lexan and other plastics with good result, but I don't really look through them like a windscreen. The three are buying, polishing and finishing compounds that are used to finish plastic projects and refurbish similar old plastics. I've used it on headlights with fair success, but they were otherwise requiring replacement. So if the shield is approaching replacement then novus and some elbow grease might be an alternative.


Tom, in Mountain Home, Idaho
2002 GL1800 (Illusion Red) Non-ABS, 122k miles
Retired Air Force

"Audentes Fortuna Juvat"

User avatar
guitarzan
Posts: 263
Joined: Sat Nov 08, 2014 7:20 pm
Location: Schererville, Indiana
Motorcycle: 1994 GL1500 SE

Re: polishing a windscreen

Post by guitarzan » Wed Jun 20, 2018 10:01 pm

Thank you Tom. I want to give it a shot. I was reading about windscreens and I guess some of them are so hard that they don't polish. Thank you for your service, always good to hear from a fellow Veteran, Marine Corps here............Thank you again Tom.

Frank
USMC Purple Heart Combat Veteran MOS 0331 Machine Gunner Vietnam 70-71
Best site ever is right here.

FM-USA
Posts: 2750
Joined: Wed May 18, 2011 8:40 am
Location: here, there
Motorcycle: mc

Re: polishing a windscreen

Post by FM-USA » Wed Jun 20, 2018 10:06 pm

guitarzan wrote:
Wed Jun 20, 2018 6:39 pm
Hi,
I'm going to try to see if I can buff out the scratches in my windscreen and I have a question. Is there anyway to tell looking at the numbers on the windscreen if it's a windscreen made of a material that scratches can be buffed out?

Thank you
Frank
**IF** I remember correctly the numbers are the MFG date and mfg. LOT number. Sometimes there is a DOT number. I haven't seen that in 40+ years, things may have changed.

IF you're using a power buffer, ONLY ON SLOW SPEED and barely any pressure and KEEP it moving. Drastic results WILL happen when the shield gets hot. Buffing by hand is the safest. When you get tired, shield cools down.

MOST shields for bikes are Poly Carbonate. To be on the safe side you can polish up one of the lower corners of the shield and see how it works. Another place to TEST your polishing materials is the edge of the shield.

My girl tried to do us a time saving favor once by using a gas station spunge-n-squeegee, she left 3 big circles of scratches from it. Took me the better part of a year (about 6 polishings) to get the scratch buffed to the point of not seeing it. It was still there, just the scratch became clear. Hardly noticed it.
It's best to use UP/DOWN polish strokes, that way if there are minute scratches or a haze, the suns glare will be less noticeable.

.

.
I'm hounded for posting helpful solutions? ARGO!!! (2012 film)
"May you have a quick & safe trip into oblivion"

User avatar
guitarzan
Posts: 263
Joined: Sat Nov 08, 2014 7:20 pm
Location: Schererville, Indiana
Motorcycle: 1994 GL1500 SE

Re: polishing a windscreen

Post by guitarzan » Wed Jun 20, 2018 10:15 pm

Up and down strokes............Got it. Thank you FM-USA I'll post how it comes out.

Thanks
Frank
USMC Purple Heart Combat Veteran MOS 0331 Machine Gunner Vietnam 70-71
Best site ever is right here.

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 19641
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: polishing a windscreen

Post by WingAdmin » Wed Jun 20, 2018 10:32 pm

FM-USA wrote:
Wed Jun 20, 2018 10:06 pm
MOST shields for bikes are Poly Carbonate.
It depends. There are far more acrylic (Plexiglas) windshields than there are polycarbonate (Lexan/Lucite), mainly due to price. Acrylic is shinier, while polycarbonate is stronger. Acrylic is less expensive but brittle easier to crack. Polycarbonate is more impact resistant but easier to scratch. For that reason, most (if not all) polycarbonate windshields are coated with a hard, scratch-resistant coating.

Acrylic is the one that you can buff scratches out of, it's very tough or impossible to do on polycarbonate.

Here's a pretty good demonstration of the two:










Post Reply