Riding in wind


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Bugmerc
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Re: Riding in wind

Post by Bugmerc » Thu Jun 08, 2017 11:52 am



Holy crap, riding in that would be a disaster!

I was looking into a belly pan and read some mixed reviews on them regarding the 1500. One being heat buildup while city driving, I do a lot of that, so that's concerning me a little. They made sense when it comes to road debris though. A hole in the oil filter could create a large problem very fast!



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rachester67
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Re: Riding in wind

Post by rachester67 » Thu Jun 08, 2017 2:36 pm

The two guys I was speaking of where on 1500s. My belly pan is ventilated like you would see on the old hot rod hoods.

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Re: Riding in wind

Post by FM-USA » Thu Jun 08, 2017 8:20 pm

rachester67 wrote:The two guys I was speaking of where on 1500s. My belly pan is ventilated like you would see on the old hot rod hoods.
Yup, oil cooler & pan support.
Can still install a shield, just need a little clearance. Someone added a couple PC fans on the front, don't know how well that worked out, was a decade ago.
I'm hounded for posting helpful solutions? ARGO!!! (2012 film)
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beastwood
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Re: Riding in wind

Post by beastwood » Sun Mar 01, 2020 6:16 pm

Well, I have ridden in crosswinds and tailwinds before, but I had my worst experience this past Thursday. I'm in southern California in San Bernardino County on I-15 north near Cucamonga. There is a stretch leading to the local mountains that is know to blow over 18 wheelers two or three time a week. I always dismissed it as something only truckers needed to worry about. Well I'm going northbound on the GL1800 and the winds are steady from the left and keep getting worse. I keep on going. They persist in getting worse. Finally the front end gets ready to lift off, and realize I should slow down and move over. There was a flat bed trailer to my right so I had to slow down to about 50, and at the point the bike only wanted to go to the right. I made it to the last lane behind the truck at about 40 and was probably white as a ghost. Upon reflection, I have decided if the winds are pushing you around like a rag doll you should pull over, reassess, maybe take a side road and reenter the freeway at a safer point.

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tamathumper
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Re: Riding in wind

Post by tamathumper » Sun Mar 01, 2020 8:03 pm

... yeah, especially if they're blowing dead across that twisty hogback coming up out of Grand Escalante Staircase, and it starts snowing, just as you see the "Cow in the Road" sign.
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newday777
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Re: Riding in wind

Post by newday777 » Mon Mar 02, 2020 6:42 am

beastwood wrote:
Sun Mar 01, 2020 6:16 pm
Well, I have ridden in crosswinds and tailwinds before, but I had my worst experience this past Thursday. I'm in southern California in San Bernardino County on I-15 north near Cucamonga. There is a stretch leading to the local mountains that is know to blow over 18 wheelers two or three time a week. I always dismissed it as something only truckers needed to worry about. Well I'm going northbound on the GL1800 and the winds are steady from the left and keep getting worse. I keep on going. They persist in getting worse. Finally the front end gets ready to lift off, and realize I should slow down and move over. There was a flat bed trailer to my right so I had to slow down to about 50, and at the point the bike only wanted to go to the right. I made it to the last lane behind the truck at about 40 and was probably white as a ghost. Upon reflection, I have decided if the winds are pushing you around like a rag doll you should pull over, reassess, maybe take a side road and reenter the freeway at a safer point.
I've had that same incident in that same location several years ago. I was delivering an empty CSC Escapade trailer I was selling to a guy in Vegas. An Empty trailer.
I hugged the left lane as close to the barrier as I could. The wind there in the funnel down out of the dry riverbed pass was cranking across the bridge. I was thinking Is this trailer going to flip over and take me over with it??? Into the heavy morning traffic??? I eventually made my way across the lanes to the right lane but it wasn't any better conditions. I pressed onward.
I've ridden in lots of high wind conditions across the country many times over the years, and yes that spot is one to avoid in high wind, if possible. Especially towing a trailer. Maybe the 215 might be a little better to avoid that spot in those conditions. I occasionally ride over to see the kids/grandkids in Vegas and have encountered the wind there more than once.
Thankfully I made it through there that day.

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Re: Riding in wind

Post by WingAdmin » Mon Mar 02, 2020 1:09 pm

Yup. You have to remember, our bikes turn by leaning. I mean, duh, yeah you lean when you turn, but if you look at the physics as to why a motorcycle actually changes direction, how you get the tires scribing a curved path, it's because of the lean. Countersteering uses this fact: you push the handlebar in the opposite direction, it displaces the front wheel, which tips the bike over, which makes the bike turn.

So...if you're riding along a road, and the wind is pushing the bike so that it is leaning over...guess what's going to happen?

I've more than once encountered wind at highway speeds that was at or exceeded what I could correct for, and I got pushed out of my lane. In those cases, the only way to fix it is to reduce speed.

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Pam
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Re: Riding in wind

Post by Pam » Mon Mar 23, 2020 9:17 am

I ride in the wind a fair amount of the time. Quite often two up, the wife will tuck her head in so the wind doesn't pull her head off. I also put my foot on the Hwy peg on the wind side this seems to act kind of like a rudder. I set the cruise and look farther down the road and let it lean. I have experienced the North Dakota cross winds the Viking spoke of, Having recently returned from Casa Grande I know that stretch can be challenging especially with the volume of traffic. Relax and don't fight it

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Re: Riding in wind

Post by WingAdmin » Wed Mar 25, 2020 9:54 pm

Riding in wind (especially gusty wind) is like flying an airplane in turbulence: You can struggle and fight every little movement trying to keep the bike (airplane) upright, or you can just relax, let the wind do its thing, and just gently guide the bike (airplane) the way you want it to go. One way leaves you exhausted at the end of the trip, the other leaves you relaxed. The end result is the same - you still get where you're going, the main effect is on how enjoyable the ride (flight) is. :)

When I was instructing, you could always tell the novice pilots by their death grip and sudden movement of the controls in turbulence, while the experienced flyers would just continue flying with a couple fingers on the controls, guide the plane gently, and let the plane do its thing. Same goes for bikes and wind! :)

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Re: Riding in wind

Post by nwkwinger » Thu Mar 26, 2020 6:50 am

I agree with letting the bike do what it wants. It's a little different, but my best experience. Several years ago, I was riding a sport bike. There was also two other guys who worked where I did and lived close to me. We rode 15 miles one way. The first day, the wind was blowing 25-30 with gusts up to 35. The next day, the wind was supposed to blow 30-35 with gusts of up to 45 (and it happened). The others drove their vehicles, while I still rode my bike. I told them that I did it on purpose just to ride home in the wind (which was the truth). On my sport bike, at least, my method for riding in high cross winds is to just sit closer to the "uphill" side of the seat and let the bike be in a constant lean. That day, I had to sit clear on the edge of the seat in order to ride home. I was still fairly vertical, but the bike was in a hard lean. My nose was right in line with the edge of the windshield. I just let the bike lean over more in a wind gust and drift over to the center of the lane. A couple of times, I was blown over the center line on the highway, but I mostly managed to hold my own lane. By the time, that I got home, my right foot was tired from me actually having to hold it onto the footpeg instead of gravity doing it for me. I did it once, just to do it. I wouldn't do it again though.



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