Ontario to British Columbia - Second '85 LTD


Reports and stories from trips, planning of gatherings, questions about how to get there!
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Rednaxs60
Posts: 1863
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1995 GL1500 SE CDN Edition
2008 GL1800 (sold)
Ontario 1985 GL1200 LTD (sold)

Re: Ontario to British Columbia - Second '85 LTD

Post by Rednaxs60 » Sat Jun 16, 2018 8:33 pm



Have a couple of days to update the thread with.

Having not resolved the issue with the bike having a hard misfire by inspecting the fuel system and finding a vacuum line that needed to be replaced, I did the last bit of work I could which was replacing the TPS. Tony from down under had mentioned this a while back, but I thought it was the fuel system. So having stopped in Brandon, Manitoba for the afternoon/evening, I replaced the TPS. Did a calibration and the engine seemed to be working well. Only did a short road test, but it was promising.

Went for Breakfast and met a fellow who had come night before on his HD. He and his friend had left their home town a while back, travelled down the east coast, across the lower states and back up into Canada. Their home town is Rouyn-Noranda just into Quebec about 1/2 hour from my Mom and Brother's place in Larder Lake. He was surprised when I mentioned Larder Lake as he knows it as well. Small world.

Was on the road by 0700 and was very surprised. There was no hard misfire, and it was working quite well through all the rpm range. It took me a while to accept and trust how the bike was performing considering what had transpired. After a long road test of some 1220 Kms, I was cautiously optimistic that the issue had been resolved. The TPS is a key element in the FI system, as are all the other components, but the TPS symptoms can be related to the others as well. I intend to do a short post on the TPS itself.

Before I did the TPS change at the hotel, I had stopped at the local McDonald for a coffee and met a fellow there who had once owned an '84 Aspencade. He was very complimentary of these old bikes and he told me the reason he sold his some 20 or so years before was that the riding in Brandon is flat and straight. The only way to get some better/different riding was to go to BC or Ontario. I totally agree with him on this, not a lot of variety in Saskatchewan.

On to the road trip itself. The day started cool and overcast, but quickly turned sunny and a nice riding temperature, not the blistering heat from the day before. To get some Kms under foot so to speak and to test out the new TPS, I was riding with the RPM at around 3900, this seemed to be the best RPM for the engine before I changed out the TPS. Engine ran well, and there was no hard misfires. I was cautious as well when stopping because I had become used to having to keep the RPM high to prevent the engine from stalling, but this was not the case anymore.

First gas stop was in Whitewood, Manitoba. Small gas bar but the restaurant had coconut cream pie, always a sign of a fine dining establishment.

The only annoying part of the trip is that there are winds on the prairie, sometimes head on and mostly from the port beam. Having to deal with the wind makes for a less than enjoyable ride. Going from Calgary to Canmore was the worst as the cross winds were very severe. The wind also cost me in fuel economy, bucking up to 60 KPH winds works the bike and uses a lot of fuel.

I mentioned doing a 1220 Km road test, that is the distance from Brandon, Manitoba to Canmore, Alberta. It was quite easy to do with a four lane highway and a good road. Stopped 4 times as well for a minimum of 1/2 hour each time. The longest off road time was about an 1 1/2 hours in Moose Jaw Saskatchewan.

With the engine working well, getting some Kms behind me was easy, very welcome, and made riding the bike very enjoyable.

Took quite a few photos and here are the best of them.

Morning in Brandon, MB:


Found this at the front of the Inn. Commonwealth Air Training Museum. Canada did a lot of pilot training for other countries during WW2:




One of the planes that was used - a Bristol Bolingbroke Mk IV:


Made it to Saskatchewan:


The road is long and winding in Saskatchewan - not! :yahoo:


Home of the Snowbirds, Moose Jaw Saskatchewan:


The town also has this gaudy moose as well. Not a good artistic presentation of the mighty moose, but it is big:


Can't go across the prairies without having a picture of the silos:


More to follow.

Cheers


"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest

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Rednaxs60
Posts: 1863
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1995 GL1500 SE CDN Edition
2008 GL1800 (sold)
Ontario 1985 GL1200 LTD (sold)

Re: Ontario to British Columbia - Second '85 LTD

Post by Rednaxs60 » Sat Jun 16, 2018 8:37 pm

Finishing up day 4.

Salt miming is done in Saskatchewan. The Saskatchewan Mining and Minerals company has a mine in Chaplin:


Made it to Alberta:


Riding into Calgary - straight and long:


Calgary is a great town. Home of the world famous Calgary Stampede - never been - and the olympic ski jump just on the west side of town:


Entering the mountains is always pleasant and to me a bit of a homecoming - love the mountains and the ocean:


That's all for now. Enjoy

Cheers
"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest

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Rednaxs60
Posts: 1863
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1995 GL1500 SE CDN Edition
2008 GL1800 (sold)
Ontario 1985 GL1200 LTD (sold)

Re: Ontario to British Columbia - Second '85 LTD

Post by Rednaxs60 » Sat Jun 16, 2018 8:41 pm

Day 5 - Last One

Had a good short stay in Canmore. Nice little town, but like everything in the Rockies, not inexpensive. Stayed at the Days Inn on its main street. The previous evening weather was rather crisp and this morning was the same as well. Decided that heated liner was the order of the day and I was correct. The mountains can be cool this time of year.

The bike started with no issues, idled up as it should, and when I twisted the throttle it did not stall – good sign.

Got on the road at about 0715 after a short stop at the local Shell station. Roads are very good in Alberta and through the National Park. Lots of road work when you enter BC as the province is working to have a four lane highway from Kamloops through to Alberta.

At one of the stops because of construction I was in behind a semi. I noticed that the fellow driving was trying to get my attention and have me move in front of him. I was appreciative of this because when we would get going again I would not be stuck behind him, but I would also like to think he was a rider as well, and since I was a small item to be seen he was looking out for me and my bike. Regardless of why, I was very appreciative of his kindness. Always a pleasant surprise when these things happen.

Going up through Roger's Pass there is still snow at road level, and it was cool and raining as well. Roger's Pass is at approximately 3400 metres, good for snow at this time of year.

Took the Coquahala from Kamloops into Hope BC. Good road and a reasonable speed limit of 120 KPH. I had been on this road many years ago and remembered there being a long downgrade into the town of Merritt. I was correct and it is 19 Kms long at a 6% grade. Fuel economy went way up for that short duration.

There was very little if any wind today and because of this, fuel economy returned to a normal usage rate. Using the travel computer, distance on a tank of fuel should be about 350 Km, not bad for an old girl. I think it will be better when I get everything sorted out when I get home.

Lots of stops on the way but mostly for gas. Been away from home for 7 weeks and it'll be nice to be back home.

Will be doing a wrap up of the trip noting some specifics such as how the Shinko Tourmaster tires are holding out. Started with 8 mm of tread depth on the rear tire, didn't do the front as the rear tire wear should provide an indication for front tire longevity. Mentioned I will be doing a post on the TPS. I also think a post/thread on how I managed to get the bike from a non-road worthy one to one that would take me around Ontario and out to BC – considerations and such. Thinking out loud here.

Canmore in the morning:


They have animal crossings on the highway through the Park:


Lots of work has been done to twin the highway going through BC. Large cuts of rock have been removed:


The mountains are still snow covered and very majestic:


There are a lot of lakes throughout the Rockies, incredibly beautiful:




Stopped at a motorcycle museum but it is closed on Tuesdays:


Attachment:

Last photo of the day - bikes in the garage. The one on the right is the one from Ontario:


Trust you have enjoyed the trip. Cheers
"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest

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Rednaxs60
Posts: 1863
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1995 GL1500 SE CDN Edition
2008 GL1800 (sold)
Ontario 1985 GL1200 LTD (sold)

Re: Ontario to British Columbia - Second '85 LTD

Post by Rednaxs60 » Sat Jun 16, 2018 8:47 pm

Requiem for the trip – post trip report

Lots of time, thought, planning went into bringing this new to me '85 LTD to the west coast from Ontario. I would never have embarked on this adventure if it had not been for the family being in Ontario and my want for another bike of the same vintage and type.

I have rode across to Ontario and back, to San Diego and back, and another short trip to LA and back. I can attest to these type of distance rides as being boring and trying sometimes. This trip had an extra component that was very enjoyable and broke up the monotony. I had my cell phone connected to my Sena headset so my partner Sonya could phone and chat with me. My brother also did this and made the trip enjoyable as well.

Having Sonya able to connect with me and chat made the trip that more enjoyable. She was able to be part of the trip without being there, was my pseudo navigator as we discussed weather, routes and distances during our chats, and she would talk about the various places en route that were specific to her family's heritage. Solo riding any distance can be made better by doing this.

I had initially bought this bike as a parts bike, and my first look at it confirmed this; however, I had the opportunity to have a second, longer look at the bike and it was in better condition than I thought. My last opportunity to determine the direction I would take with this bike came at Christmas last when I told my brother that we had to try and start the bike or it was a boat anchor. With luck in my court, the bike did start and was able to move under its own power.

With the bike now a viable road worthy candidate, I set out to determine what I needed to do to bring this bike under its own power from northern Ontario to Victoria, BC.

To meet a timeline many items/components had to be prepped in advance. There was thought put into the electrical system upgrades such as wiring, relays OEM style connectors, and tools required to do the work.

There was also the unknowns that will come to the fore and have to be addressed. I did not have an unlimited budget, but I had planned and ensured that I would have sufficient capital to give myself the best possible chance to ride this new to me biker across Canada as trouble free as possible.

There was an initial “scraping” sound in the rear engine case that I concluded was from the clutch pack. Had comments that corroborated this and can now report that this sound has disappeared. The lack of a neutral light at the start of this project was an annoyance, but is now more common than not.

Had trouble getting a neutral indication on the dash when first starting this project. Since the work and ride across to Victoria, the neutral light is now coming on more often – nothing like using a bike to get it to work properly.

Realizing that the symptoms for a faulty throttle position sensor (TPS) and a fuel system issue are virtually the same was an eyeopener; however, I think there are minor differences that allow me to know the difference between the two.

I also had the help and constructive advice from many on the forum when I did have a hiccup in the schedule for which I am very grateful.

Did the fuel system pressure check – 36 PSI with the ignition switch on – engine not started, and 33 PSI with engine started. Slightly high with engine started but can live with it.

Compression test done with engine cold after a night's rest – results: #1/#2/#4 125 PSI #3 – 135 PSI.

Balanced all four cylinders as best that could be done. Did not do a cleaning of the throttle plate at this time, for the near future.

I reported previously that there was a possible coolant/oil leak from the water pump weep hole. I have seen a few more drops from the weep hole so a water pump rebuild may be in order. I did notice during the work in Ontario that the water pump impeller had about a 1/4 inch play when moved. Will investigate and correct.

Checked the spark plugs yesterday for colour and how each cylinder was firing. Cylinder three was reported on previously as not firing, or not firing enough because the porcelain was still white. This colour has darkened ever so slightly, but this could be TPS and balance related. I now have the time to do a more thorough calibration of the TPS regarding this – and I am prepping another new TPS for install. New plugs have been installed.

Happy to report that the mod to the Honda Civic TPS where I drilled the TPS actuating arm and installed a small screw that was consequently covered with JB Weld is working well. The JB weld gives this mod a lot of strength.

An oil change was first on the list to do when I got back, and I used about 8/10ths of a quart of oil from Ontario to Victoria, BC. Would like to be able to a leak down test to determine what is leaking, rings, valves or valve guide seals. Have had an oil plume at first start up in the morning so the vale stem seals may need to be replaced.

Overall I am pleased with getting the bike to Victoria, and will now determine a way ahead regarding the two bikes. My intention is to keep both road worthy; however, there will be one that will be my daily and touring bike – the best of two worlds so to speak.

Great project and adventure. Another item stricken from the bucket list.

Trust everyone had an enjoyable read. I know I enjoyed reporting on this endeavour.

Cheers
"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest

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EasyBadger
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Motorcycle: 1982 GL 500 I (Silvy)
1985 GL 1200 Ltd (Goldy)
1985 GL 1200 Ltd (parts bike)

Re: Ontario to British Columbia - Second '85 LTD

Post by EasyBadger » Mon Jun 18, 2018 10:10 am

Hi Rednaxs60,

I can´t wait to see your thread about the TPS. I saw in an older thread, that the sensor can be adjusted with a screw, which can make a huge difference in the gas mileage. I also looked it up in the service manual, but the pictures are not very clear. I filled up mine now for 2 times and the average consumption is at around 7.2 L/100 km, which is pretty high.

Safe rides,
Jens

rcgreg
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Joined: Sun Jul 10, 2011 11:46 am
Location: Creston BC Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 Limited

Re: Ontario to British Columbia - Second '85 LTD

Post by rcgreg » Mon Jun 18, 2018 10:28 am

Mine is 15 KM per litre - but the throttle comes on all at once - causing a big thump in the final drive

gervais
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Location: riviere-bleue,quebec,canda
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Re: Ontario to British Columbia - Second '85 LTD

Post by gervais » Mon Jun 18, 2018 10:45 am

if you are playing with the TPS,you better know what you are doing!

it will effect not only the mpg

gervais

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Rednaxs60
Posts: 1863
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1995 GL1500 SE CDN Edition
2008 GL1800 (sold)
Ontario 1985 GL1200 LTD (sold)

Re: Ontario to British Columbia - Second '85 LTD

Post by Rednaxs60 » Mon Jun 18, 2018 2:11 pm

I averaged 16 Km/litre on the way across, was hoping for better as my '85 LTD out here routinely gets 5.4 to 6.2 litres per 100 Km (19.2 to 16.1 Km per litre). Still not bad for a bike that has not been on the road for four years.

As for the TPS it's a fine balancing act and the calibration is finicky at best. Getting it between 0.475 and 0.495 VDC is not a large range and takes some patience and time. Setting the TPS calibration too close or lower than the lower limit could result in a rough idle or because the ECU would be allowing less fuel into the engine, conversely at or over the upper limit could result in sluggish response since the ECU may see a longer idle section on the TPS, and increased fuel input at idle and start up. I have this scenario at this time. Takes time and patience as I have mentioned to get it spot on especially with an aftermarket TPS that was not designed to fit this bike, and with the external alt mod installed.

The other issue is having a 0.110 inch spacer to use to calibrate the TPS. Trying to find one, but have had to make one. If you are going to adjust the TPS, balance the cylinder banks and set the idle first. Then spray carb cleaner down the air intake to clean the throttle plates, check idle and balance one more time. The set the TPS to match.

Cheers
"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest

Rusti1
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2017 10:41 pm
Location: Vic BC Canada
Motorcycle: 87 Transalp (for now)

Re: Ontario to British Columbia - Second '85 LTD

Post by Rusti1 » Wed Jun 20, 2018 6:27 pm

Add another interest or "+1" for Rednax's post on the TPS... And if you are considering doing a post/thread on prep and considerations made and done on getting your 2nd bike ready for your cross country trip, then I too am eager to read and learn up the knowledge... and by the way followed this thread eagerly haha for the prepping your "new" bike and the adventure of bringing it home....thanks for sharing, great pics and great job!
-Russ

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Rednaxs60
Posts: 1863
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1995 GL1500 SE CDN Edition
2008 GL1800 (sold)
Ontario 1985 GL1200 LTD (sold)

Re: Ontario to British Columbia - Second '85 LTD

Post by Rednaxs60 » Wed Jun 20, 2018 11:44 pm

Thought I recognized the Transalp, it could be considered the forerunner to the Africa Twin.

Thanks for the complement. More work to do regarding putting the bike back on the road, putting my thoughts in order as well. These forums have helped and assisted me in so many ways, just trying to give back.

Cheers
"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest

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Rednaxs60
Posts: 1863
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1995 GL1500 SE CDN Edition
2008 GL1800 (sold)
Ontario 1985 GL1200 LTD (sold)

Re: Ontario to British Columbia - Second '85 LTD

Post by Rednaxs60 » Thu Jun 21, 2018 10:47 am

Post work and trip report.

Time to put my thoughts down on paper regarding what I did in Ontario and why, as well as the follow on to the resurrection and road trip across Canada from northern Ontario to Victoria BC.

There was much that needed to be done especially after my brother and I got the engine started and the bike went from a parts bike to a road bike. I can say that if the bike was not at my brother's place, and I did not have his garage and facilities to do the work, I would not have attempted this. In place of this I might have been tempted to buy another one at more of a premium, or get a different bike all together.

Having taken an '85 LTD that was on the road, and updated/upgraded it to as new a condition as possible, I had a good idea of what needed to be done to get the bike from Ontario with the minimum amount of work to be done, but necessary to have the bike safe to travel across Canada.

As with all projects of this nature, and from having perused the various GW forums, the amount of information available to a person to resurrect one of these older GWs is quite a lot. I took this information, and my penchant to over maintain what I own, and had a list of what should be done to resurrect, or bring one of these bikes back to its former glory.

Making the bike safe for the road is the first issue. This entails tries, brakes and mechanical items that may affect personal and bike safety. Next address the engine components and what has to be done such as fluids. Do the basic maintenance on the bike such as lubricating the rear drive.

Items that I needed to address were:

1. new timing belts;
2. check tires for date stamp and condition;
3. rebuild brake calipers;
4. new brake pads;
5. ensure all electrical components work and work as they should such as signals, brake lights, head lights, horn(s), gauge lights, and such;
6. condition of upholstery, no sense in being uncomfortable, and eventually this will be on the list of things needed to be done;
7. change out all fluids;
8. coolant system condition, rad fan start/stop, rad flush;
9. starting system condition;
10. electrical charging system condition;
11. electrical connector condition; and
12. suspension condition.

These are global issues and once you start to delve into these areas, there will be other issues that may need to be addressed. I used this framework to assit in determining what I needed to do to my second '85 LTD.

At Christmas last, I did a good review of the bike and decided on the following as a minimum:

1. brake caliper rebuild;
2. timing belts;
3. new tires;
4. rewiring for various electrical upgrades;
5. install relays for external alt mod sense and excite wiring, new horns, and switched circuits for the new accessory fuse block install;
6. GPS mount and electrical install;
7. replace horns with aftermarket FIAMMS Freeway Blaster;
8. troubleshoot to make horns work – check switch;
9. do maintenance on the rear drive;
10. new brake pads;
11. rebuild the clutch slave cylinder because of all the crud found in the clutch system when flushing the clutch fluid; and
12. replace all fluids, brake/clutch/coolant.

When I returned to Ontario to get the bike ready for the trip across Canada, I gave myself a 7 day window on arrival to do the work necessary to get the bike ready for its first road trip. Before returning to Ontario, I did a lot of work preparing work packages that would allow me to do various installs and work to maximize the work in the first week.

The most extensive work packages were the electrical wiring upgrade and install, and the external alt mod. I went with the external alt mod because it is easier to replace an external alternator than a stator while on a distance trip. My second reason for this was that the PO had used an RR from a different bike with a smaller stator, and because of this, the size of the installed stator was brought into question.

I would have liked to do testing such as fuel pressure, cylinder pressure and the likes but I did not have the tools available.

Testing the fuel pressure would have probably have gotten me to the TPS being an issue a lot sooner than it did, and it would have made the trip around Ontario and across Canada much more enjoyable. I did get to changing the TPS at the half way point across Canada, and once done, the bike did carry me across Canada and it is still going – a testament to the robustness of these 1200 GWs.

Since arriving back in Victoria, I have done a fuel system pressure check – IAW OEM spec, a cylinder pressure test – cold at 125 to 135 PSI, a cylinder bank balance and idle calibration. I intend to change out the TPS to make sure I have at least two good TPS units just in case.

I would like to be able to test the TPS units with an oscilloscope as per this web site - http://autoditex.com/page/throttle-posi ... -22-1.html – however, this is not going to happen any time soon. I am doing additional research to determine if there is a better style of aftermarket TPS that would better suit as a replacement for the OEM TPS.

I noticed in Ontario and since I returned home that I have a very slight and intermittent leak through the weep hole for the water pump. Along with this is that when I installed the external alt mod, I checked the water pump for movement and found it to move. I have researched this and have read that there is supposed to be no movement. This will need to be addressed before too long.

My intention is to change out the water pump with new, rebuild the old as a spare for the two bikes. At the same time I will be cleaning the rad as the engine does heat up quite fast compared to my other '85 LTD.

I will be changing the wheel, steering stem and swing arm bearings as well as changing out the brake and clutch lines on this new bike.

I checked the brake rotor thickness. The front rotors have some life left in them, but the rear rotor is at the minimum. I am presently looking for replacement rotors.

I changed the front fork oil in Ontario with a 10 weight oil, all I could get on short notice in the local town. Intend to change it out and replace with 20 weight this coming winter.

I will be taking the engine out and replacing the vacuum hoses, and doing a good cleaning of the bike.

I also intend to prepare one bike as my daily ride and touring bike, the second one as an opportunity ride, and as my ride when I do maintenance/work on my main bike.

Having mention the above, My work list is developing quite well, as is the parts list.

I have determined which platform will be used as my main ride and it is this second '85 LTD. Will be able to swap parts over between the two bikes.

I have made this decision because I have a suspicion that my Victoria '85 LTD was in an altercation of sorts. What leads me to this possible conclusion, without objective evidence is that the travel computer, front forks, rad and how the steering turns and touched the wind screen is not quite what I would expect. Additionally, the travel computer and rad had that tell tale yellow marker that a wrecking yard uses to identify parts for sale. The front fork upper tubes are not identical as well.

Work list in no particular order or time frame:

1. new water pump;
2. clean out spark plug drain holes;
3. rear brake rotor;
4. front brake rotors;
5. steering stem bearings;
6. wheel bearings;
7. new rear wheel cush bearings;
8. swing arm bearings;
9. remove, clean, paint centre stand;
10. install driving lights;
11. have rad cleaned;
12. investigate and correct final drive oil leak;
13. change front fork oil to 20 weight;
14. brake and clutch line replacement; and
15. remove engine – do vacuum lines – possible painting of engine and area.

Cosmetic changes:

1. clean and paint rims – have spare set so can work on while using the bike;
2. investigate painting of upper fairing where paint is peeling; and
3. new radio antenna.

Doing the above work will entail more time than money. I have kept track of the cost for most of this work because I did it on my Victoria '85 LTD. Costing the parts and accumulating over a year will make this work very economical. I have set out a budget of $1000.00 for parts and such, but there will be a considerable investment of time for this work and to get the bikes to where I want them.

Considering the build threads I have read and what many are doing with these older GWs, I'm not embarking on too great a work project. I do know that I will have two good rides when I am finished.

I'm now going to progress to enjoying the summer riding season with Sonya, and my HD friends. Depending on the day and the mood will depend on which bike I use. At this stage, both are good candidates for riding anywhere I want to go. Have a lot of trust in both.

Thanks for reading and dropping by.

Cheers
"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest

rcgreg
Posts: 195
Joined: Sun Jul 10, 2011 11:46 am
Location: Creston BC Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 Limited

Re: Ontario to British Columbia - Second '85 LTD

Post by rcgreg » Tue Jun 26, 2018 7:52 am

i was looking into the TPS calibration procedure, in the book they use a special cable for it - is it required or is there a different way?

User avatar
Rednaxs60
Posts: 1863
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1995 GL1500 SE CDN Edition
2008 GL1800 (sold)
Ontario 1985 GL1200 LTD (sold)

Re: Ontario to British Columbia - Second '85 LTD

Post by Rednaxs60 » Tue Jun 26, 2018 10:07 am

Honda calls these cables inspection adapters. All it is for the TPS is a three wire adapter that has the OEM connectors and a 3 wire tap coming off it. You can do the same by cutting the wires from the TPS to the connector under the shelter and splicing in three wires so that you have a way to check the TPS. If you do not want to cut the wires, strip the insulation off each wire and solder on a wire tap. This works the same as the OEM inspection adapter. The wire from the TPS to the connector is 18 gauge standard wire.

I have done this to both of mine and have the wire tap in by the air cleaner so that all I have to do is lift the travel computer and plug in my meter to the TPS wiring.

Cheers


"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest

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