Rationalizing Bikes


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Rednaxs60
Posts: 1806
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1995 GL1500 SE CDN Edition
2008 GL1800 (sold)
Ontario 1985 GL1200 LTD (sold)

Re: Rationalizing Bikes

Post by Rednaxs60 » Sat Sep 01, 2018 11:14 am



Alan53072 wrote:
Sat Sep 01, 2018 9:52 am
I too had a 1200, was very happy with it until I rode a friend's 1500 through an Advanced Rider Course track. So I got the 1500. Was very happy with it until I rode a friend's 1800..... So I got an 1800. Bottom line - don't look at or ride anyone else's bike! It gets expensive :lol:
Still have my '85 LTD. I have learned a lot from it and with the work I intend to do this winter will learn more.

Had an 1800, very nice ride but had to modify the seat so that I could ride comfortably. I have/had several reasons for choosing the 1500, one is price point from which I knew that I would be doing maintenance/work (1500 or 1800), and this would add to the initial cost outlay. The ergonomics of the cockpit is better for a taller rider. I expected it would be easier to work on and in some ways it is. I surmised that it would be less work/maintenance than having a second '85 LTD. Parts, etc should be more available - keeping one '85 LTD going is a challenge. I am less distracted while driving because the 1500, as well as the 1800, does not have as many bells and whistles to play with like the '85 LTD does.

If you are looking for a sports touring bike in the GW line, an 1800 with the extra ponies and torque, with a suspension upgrade is the way to go. I would also say that a 1200 with a good engine, all maintenance done, and a suspension upgrade also falls into this category. The 1500 is close only because of the lesser HP - same as the 1200. The 1200 once in the power band should outperform the 1500 in the twisties (not getting into a rider's skill set) - just my opinion.

I have installed new Progressive fork springs and 416 series air shocks in my 1500 and the ride and performance is quite good. Very stable in the corners. Have some electrical work to do for accessories, but other than this, the 1500 is a very nice ride - the Mrs likes it as well.

Took the new 1800 for a ride. Nice bike, very impressed with the front suspension. Other than this, very nice new bike. If it is what you want/need, it will be a great ride. Not in the cards for me at this time.

There may be an 1800 in my future, never know, but I have owned and put a lot of Kms on one. The main issue I think is that if you want to upgrade, knowing the reason why is paramount. If it's because you just want to, it's okay. Coming up with a list of what you want and need in an upgrade to substantiate your decision, all good as well.

Only come this way once, enjoy and have fun. My Father told me when I turned 50 that I had fewer birthdays in front of me than behind. With this in mind, I'm going to have fun and enjoy my time remaining.

Ride safe. Cheers


"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest

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jgarrett
Posts: 15
Joined: Fri Sep 04, 2015 9:25 am
Location: Nebraska
Motorcycle: 1985 Goldwing Limited, GL1200L

Re: Rationalizing Bikes

Post by jgarrett » Sat Sep 01, 2018 2:36 pm

Alan53072 wrote:
Sat Sep 01, 2018 9:52 am
I too had a 1200, was very happy with it until I rode a friend's 1500 through an Advanced Rider Course track. So I got the 1500. Was very happy with it until I rode a friend's 1800..... So I got an 1800. Bottom line - don't look at or ride anyone else's bike! It gets expensive :lol:
I had a 2001 1800 when they first came out and was like "this sure uses lots of gas for a motorcycle! I LOVE my 85 Limited and wouldn't trade it for a 1800 but have never ridden the 1500 so can't really comment there. My GL1200L is so beautiful, it's like artwork it speaks to me and I love it more than any bike I have ever owned. Would sure like modern brakes and a few other features but I get by fine without them. Sometimes I look at that bike and think I'm the luckiest guy in the world and mine is paid for too. Guess that last part makes it the best bike for me!
I bought it from a farmer (not charging) for $1500 and 30K miles. Soldered the wires and it charges like a champ!

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SlowTyper
Posts: 100
Joined: Fri Jun 25, 2010 7:37 am
Location: Pierre, SD
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 Aspencade

Re: Rationalizing Bikes

Post by SlowTyper » Sat Sep 01, 2018 3:23 pm

I ride a GL1200. But have ridden a borrowed 1500 and test driven an 1800.

Personally, I didn't care for the ride of the 1500. It didn't have the sporty feel that makes me prefer a bike to a cage. I will take my 1200 over a 1500 any day.

I loved my 1800 test ride; the sporty response of the throttle was welcome and I was amazed at how well it handled. It did not want to stand up when accelerating out of a corner, and the lack of integrated braking allowed me to get it stopped in a shorter distance.

One thing to keep in mind about a GL1200 is the electrical system. If you like to add electronic gadgets and lights like I do, keeping the total load under 18 amps (so the stator can keep up) is a serious challenge.

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jgarrett
Posts: 15
Joined: Fri Sep 04, 2015 9:25 am
Location: Nebraska
Motorcycle: 1985 Goldwing Limited, GL1200L

Re: Rationalizing Bikes

Post by jgarrett » Sat Sep 01, 2018 3:50 pm

I just had a new "Ricks" regulator soldered in and it does not have ONE aftermarket or accessory on the entire bike except for highway boards. I keep the load as light as possible. I watch it all the time now that it didn't work once! haha But it is holding steady at 14.1 volts.

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Rednaxs60
Posts: 1806
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1995 GL1500 SE CDN Edition
2008 GL1800 (sold)
Ontario 1985 GL1200 LTD (sold)

Re: Rationalizing Bikes

Post by Rednaxs60 » Sat Sep 01, 2018 7:58 pm

The 1200 series are great bikes. I like my '85 LTD with fuel injection - great fuel economy. Great for two up touring as well. Considering going back to air shocks on the rear as well.

Have done an external alternator mod and appreciated the ease of repair when I was on my way to LA last fall. Alternator went out in Redding CA. Local Honda shop had me back on the road and going in 24 hours. If you tour a lot with these bikes an external alternator install can be advantageous.

Have a theory that two bikes are required just in case one needs work/maintenance. My '85 LTD has low compression so I will be doing a leak down test to confirm the issue is not the rings, then do a valve lapping - winter project, and still have a bike to ride.

Since owning the 1500 and having owned an 1800 and own a 1200, I like them all. Each has strengths and weaknesses, but overall great rides.

It's like a yard sale, one person's junk is another's treasure.

Cheers
"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest

bryanw1
Posts: 16
Joined: Thu Jan 04, 2018 12:08 am
Location: Grantsville, Utah
Motorcycle: 2001 Goldwing 1800
2017 Goldwing 1800

Re: Rationalizing Bikes

Post by bryanw1 » Sat Sep 01, 2018 10:14 pm

I have succumbed to the phenomenon of riding other bikes as well, and it does get expensive. When I think of my first Wing, a '79 GL1000, it's nothing but good memories. Realistically, it had everything I needed. Plenty of power. Smooth. Quiet. It handled as well as my ability could push it. Sure, the fairing, bags, and trunk were Vetter, but they worked well. There was no in helmet audio, bluetooth, GPS, etc., but those things didn't exist yet so they couldn't be missed. New things will always come along. If they didn't there would be no need to buy one because it's almost impossible to wear one out. I've never come close.

I've decided that, for me, a major component happiness is to try to spent most of my time appreciating how good it is now compared to what was and very little on what could be. There will always be a better mouse trap.That said, I just this year sold a bike that was 16 years old and in perfect working order and replaced it with a new '17 that I blue toothed. I'm 66 years old now, so this likely will be my last bike. But when I go to the dealer for an oil filter I almost always browse over to the floor to see what's new.

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someone548
Posts: 127
Joined: Thu Jul 07, 2016 7:02 pm
Location: Tullahoma, TN
Motorcycle: 1995 Goldwing Aspencade

Re: Rationalizing Bikes

Post by someone548 » Tue Sep 11, 2018 5:28 pm

WingAdmin wrote:
Wed Jul 25, 2018 6:09 pm
someone548 wrote:
Wed Jul 25, 2018 10:07 am
I have a 95 1500 myself. Working on it really isn't bad at all. At times, there is a lot of plastic to remove depending on the job but none of it is difficult. I never have the thought of kicking the crap out of the engineer who designed the thing. Virtually everything is accessible and very well thought out.
You obviously haven't had to rebuild your rear brake master cylinder yet then. :)
I have not just yet. I was speaking generally. :)

edgreenberg
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2018 4:57 pm
Location: Glens Falls, NY
Motorcycle: 2010 GL1800

Re: Rationalizing Bikes

Post by edgreenberg » Thu Sep 20, 2018 9:40 am

I had a 1995 Wineberry GL1500, 20th Anniversary Edition. I sold it in 2000, when I bought a pickup and 5th wheel trailer. Just bought a newer Wing (a 2010 GL1800). While I love the new bike, I really should have held on to the old one. I loved it.

One negative on the older bikes (and the 1500s are classed that way now) is that parts may not be available. Other than that, you'll love cruising around on the 1500.

Ed G

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Rednaxs60
Posts: 1806
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1995 GL1500 SE CDN Edition
2008 GL1800 (sold)
Ontario 1985 GL1200 LTD (sold)

Re: Rationalizing Bikes

Post by Rednaxs60 » Thu Sep 20, 2018 10:03 am

edgreenberg wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2018 9:40 am
I had a 1995 Wineberry GL1500, 20th Anniversary Edition. I sold it in 2000, when I bought a pickup and 5th wheel trailer. Just bought a newer Wing (a 2010 GL1800). While I love the new bike, I really should have held on to the old one. I loved it.

One negative on the older bikes (and the 1500s are classed that way now) is that parts may not be available. Other than that, you'll love cruising around on the 1500.

Ed G
I am enjoying riding the 1500, great bike as they all are. Still have my '85 Limited Edition that is in my garage for a valve job - low compression. Parts are a challenge but with some searching there are a lot of parts interchangeable between the 1200/1500/1800. The suspension upgrade has been a welcome change. More firm than the older OEM suspension, but to be expected, and the handling has improved immensely.

Older bikes and I class the 1800 (up to 2017) in that category as well, will be a challenge as we go forward mostly because most newer motorcycles do not use parts as much as we think. Companies do a failure mode, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA) to determine parts requirements, and with the reliability of newer parts, even those made offshore, stock levels can be quite low. Besides, OEMs do not want us to fix our bikes, the companies want us to throw away the old and buy new. Terrible waste of resources and equipment in my mind.

Enough of my thoughts. Thanks for the kind post. Cheers


"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest

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