J&M Bluetooth Audio


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bryanw1
Posts: 22
Joined: Thu Jan 04, 2018 12:08 am
Location: Grantsville, Utah
Motorcycle: 2001 Goldwing 1800
2017 Goldwing 1800

J&M Bluetooth Audio

Post by bryanw1 » Wed Oct 10, 2018 10:59 pm



Just need to give a shout out to give credit where it is due. Bought a bluetooth audio system from J&M Corp. early this year when they were first released. I've had integration problems with it. Sent an email stating the problem and received an answer that night from the owner, John Lazzeroni, and have been talking about it with him for a week. He determined that the problem was with the headset units. They need to be upgraded to units that have been developed since I bought mine.

He sent shipping instructions to have them sent back and the new units installed, no charge.

I have been buying their products for almost 20 years because of service like this. A lot of companies could learn from them.



bryanw1
Posts: 22
Joined: Thu Jan 04, 2018 12:08 am
Location: Grantsville, Utah
Motorcycle: 2001 Goldwing 1800
2017 Goldwing 1800

J&M Bluetooth Audio

Post by bryanw1 » Mon Oct 22, 2018 9:53 pm

I am posting this to several GW forum sites because I don't know how much crossover traffic there is between sites.

When I wanted a new GW early this year, but decided after a lot of research that I couldn't live with some of the changes in the 2018, I decided on a new 2017. I learned about the same time that they can be blue toothed, which was one of my main attractions to the 2018. Seems I'm slow to learn, but I don't research the new stuff when I'm not in the market, so it tends to run in 5 to 10 year cycles. After a lot more research, I decided on the J&M setup over the Sena, primarily because I felt the customer support would be better with a small company vs. a world-wide corporation. I've also been dealing with J&M for wired set-ups since about 2000, and knew them to be good at supporting their products.

I expected some problems with the equipment because it was brand new, in fact they shipped me one of the first ones to be released. I wasn't disappointed. There were problems with an echo in the intercom system and the phones weren't integrating with the headsets properly. Problem is, I usually only thought about it while riding or when too busy to deal with it. Finally, one Sunday night a couple of weeks ago I got on their website and sent an email to their customer service people describing the problems, hoping for a response the next day. I got and answer back less than an hour later from the owner of the company, John Lazzeroni, which started a chain of events that led to my sending both helmets back to them for updated units that have been developed to deal with the initial problems. They were done and back in less than a week. One phone integration problem persisted with one of the units. I called today, explained the problem, and the tech kept checking into it and calling me back. After about an hour the problem was solved.

This has caused me to think about differences in companies. It seems some of the big ones could learn from the small ones. Honda has problems and seems to take forever to deal with them if at all. It's like, "You bought it knowing it was new. What did you expect?" That is somewhat true, but the buyer of the first unit off the line has a right to expect it to either work as advertised, or a concerted effort made to make it work as advertised. Forty-five years ago Ford had Pintos exploding with rear impact due to faulty engineering of the fuel tank. At some point a bunch of high priced, highly educated people sat around a table looking at a cost analysis that found the cheapest alternative to a recall was to continue to pay wrongful death lawsuits until the problem went away. It seems that a group of first graders could have seen the problem with that business model. I owned a Pinto then. Since then, I 45 years and at least 15 cars later, I've never bought another Ford. To top it off was the more recent problem with the Firestone tires being installed on Ford Explorers that were coming apart at freeway speed, killing people. Rather than being gun-shy, they decided again to deny the problem until evidence forced them to deal with it. It further crippled Ford and Firestone. You'd think that something like that would put them out of business, but apparently part of their calculation involved an estimation of the publics' short memory.

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