'83 GL1100 - diagnosing why RPMs won't come down


Information and questions on GL1100 Goldwings (1980-1983)
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sacruickshank
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Joined: Sun Mar 19, 2017 7:37 am
Location: Boston, MA
Motorcycle: 1983 GL1100 Standard
1998 BMR R1100R
Several other VJM's

'83 GL1100 - diagnosing why RPMs won't come down

Post by sacruickshank » Mon Apr 08, 2019 5:46 am



Hi all,

I'm trying to get the carbs dialed in on a bike that's being resurrecting from PO. I know this topics been covered in numerous threads, but I wanted to start fresh rather than interpret similiar, but slightly different situations. Thanks in advance.

Previously it would start and idle on choke, but die when off choke. I assumed it was blocked slow jet passages so I took the carb bank off the bike, pulled the little bits out of each carb, gave it a good ultrasonic pine sol bath, and verified clear passages with compressed air. I checked the float heights, which were close to the 15mm at each end, although not perfect. I suspect the aftermarket floats are slightly shorter than OEM and was reaching the limit of bending the float tang without restricting its movement on the shaft.

Controversy Alert - I did not completely dis-assemble the rack because it didn't have fuel leaks and I didn't want to mess with all the linkages and rubber bits in the various fuel passages.

It's now re-assembled and starts right up with choke and settles down to 1500 rpm idle. I know, that's still too high for a goldwing. Problem is, when I take the choke off and give it a little throttle, it will jump up to 3-4k rpm and never come down.

The return throttle cable needs better routing to let the throttle plates return more quickly, but they do return. The air/fuel mixture screws were set to 3 turns out, and I tried a few other settings, but they don't seem to have any effect on the high RPMs.

At this point my guess is an air leak somewhere in the chain, but am open to other suggestions. I'll try options that don't involve pulling the carb rack out again, but will pull them again if needed.



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Johnyy Smoke
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Motorcycle: 1980 GL1100
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Re: '83 GL1100 - diagnosing why RPMs won't come down

Post by Johnyy Smoke » Sun Apr 14, 2019 6:06 am

Try syncing the carbs. Regards, Johnny

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newday777
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Location: Milford NH summer and fall Oceanside, CA winters(N San Diego) with lots of miles riden between
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1983 GL1100A Wineberry 36,000 miles

1975 CB750 K5 Planet Blue 7,800 miles

1976 CB750 K6 Anterris Red 25,000 miles

Past rides
1999A Restored and sold at 19,000 miles

1999SE Totaled by cager at 105,000 miles

Re: '83 GL1100 - diagnosing why RPMs won't come down

Post by newday777 » Sun Apr 14, 2019 8:01 am

"Controversy Alert - I did not completely dis-assemble the rack because it didn't have fuel leaks and I didn't want to mess with all the linkages and rubber bits in the various fuel passages. "

This is your problem. Your choice was not a good choice.

You have to totally disassemble the rack and carbs. These are an intricate carb system that when done correctly work great. And conversely, when improperly done, have lots of problems.
There are the tiny fuel passages where the old fuel gums up between the carbs and through the plenum. And there are orings on the fuel tubes between the carbs that need to be replaced.
Also, if you bought cheap carb kits, they will compound improper cleaning. What carb kits did you buy? I highly recommend Randakks Master carb kit, this includes the big plenum formed Vinton rubber seal that needs to be replaced(you don't get this with any other kit, or from Honda).
K & L carb kits are second on my list.
Cheap kits include brass that doesn't need replacement and is usually a source of problems.
The stock floats usually fine and don't need replacement.
Do it right.


http://www.randakksblog.com/gl1100-carb-details/

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