The Invisible Motorcycle


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MiWinger51
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Motorcycle: 1987 GL1200A Aspencade Sold in 2018 to a collector.
2006 GL 1800 audio comfort navi
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Re: The Invisible Motorcycle

Post by MiWinger51 » Thu Aug 31, 2017 6:57 am



Corkster52 wrote:
Thu Aug 31, 2017 6:04 am
wireguy51 » Sun Aug 27, 2017 2:51 pm


I read about a modulator made by Kriss Industries in the GL1800 riders forum. It is a plug and play that goes under your seat and attaches to a relay. It is pricey but I believe that most time you get what you pay for. Here is a link.
http://www.kriss.com/gl1800mod.php
Al, I will keep an eye on this thread to see what you do and how it works!
After getting home from our ride, I ordered the headlight modulator and rear trunk bar that I showed you. The old lady who tried to kill me in Ann Arbor convinced me. I swear how can you pull into a lane with a 800 lb motorcycle, a 280 lb rider in hi vis jacket and helmet with horn blowing and be so damned unaware.


Live to Ride---Ride to Live
Al

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Re: The Invisible Motorcycle

Post by FM-USA » Thu Aug 31, 2017 7:10 am

wireguy51 wrote:
Thu Aug 31, 2017 6:57 am

After getting home from our ride, I ordered the headlight modulator and rear trunk bar that I showed you. The old lady who tried to kill me in Ann Arbor convinced me. I swear how can you pull into a lane with a 800 lb motorcycle, a 280 lb rider in hi vis jacket and helmet with horn blowing and be so damned unaware.
HAD THAT HAPPEN a few times.
I swear, "they know you're there, they just don't care".
I'm behind a vehicle in the left lane, we're slowly passing a car in the right lane. One lady pulls up behind us then moves to the right lane. She's now pacing us and signals to move into the space were in. It took a good 10 seconds of horn blast for her to look left to see us. On purpose? Maybe, we kept going.
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Corkster52
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Re: The Invisible Motorcycle

Post by Corkster52 » Fri Sep 01, 2017 6:57 am

by wireguy51 » Thu Aug 31, 2017 7:57 am

After getting home from our ride, I ordered the headlight modulator and rear trunk bar that I showed you.
Get that bad boy installed before the event later this month! I'll check it out then and see what I need to do to my bike.

dekare
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Re: The Invisible Motorcycle

Post by dekare » Fri Sep 01, 2017 7:05 am

I backed out of my driveway with a mini-van no less, so lots of visibility. I was quite surprised and horrified that there she sat, on her bike patiently waiting for me to get out of the way. As it turned out I have lots of trees in the neighborhood and looking down the street black is a predominate color. The black bike and black clothing blended into the surrounding colors. I needed to be more cautious, but she needed to do her part in wanting to be seen also.

Incidentally, the most noticed bikes on the roads I feel are the yellow Gold Wings. If I didn't already wear Hi-Viz, I'd have one.

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Re: The Invisible Motorcycle

Post by WingAdmin » Fri Sep 01, 2017 7:37 am

dekare wrote:
Fri Sep 01, 2017 7:05 am
I backed out of my driveway with a mini-van no less, so lots of visibility. I was quite surprised and horrified that there she sat, on her bike patiently waiting for me to get out of the way. As it turned out I have lots of trees in the neighborhood and looking down the street black is a predominate color. The black bike and black clothing blended into the surrounding colors. I needed to be more cautious, but she needed to do her part in wanting to be seen also.

Incidentally, the most noticed bikes on the roads I feel are the yellow Gold Wings. If I didn't already wear Hi-Viz, I'd have one.
I think you're right about the yellow GL1800's. I read a study a while back where they presented a test group of people different scenarios with different colored motorcycles, to try to determine if one color of bike was less noticed than others. The result was not what you think. The most visible color was white. The least visible color was RED.

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Re: The Invisible Motorcycle

Post by FM-USA » Fri Sep 01, 2017 8:04 am

Hummm, pondering....
White and black are from the OLD DAYS in squad car colors. Probably we're still TUNED to look for them?
Vehicles slow down when seeing motorcycle riders wearing all white helmets.

Thinking on background colors, it's hard to imagine yellow not being the most outstanding color, but possible.

RED vehicles and RED brake lights = Are accident makers.
. . . . . . . OPEN PICTURE TO SEE


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Re: The Invisible Motorcycle

Post by FM-USA » Fri Sep 01, 2017 8:44 am

I'm not trying to prove anyone wrong, just posting a pix to compare.
.


.


.
I KNOW... i know, should be more colors.

.
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C-dub
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Re: The Invisible Motorcycle

Post by C-dub » Fri Sep 01, 2017 9:39 am

While I wanted the white one for this very reason, the financial adviser said she like the black one that was still new, but one year older at a substantial discount because of that.
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dtrider
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Re: The Invisible Motorcycle

Post by dtrider » Fri Sep 01, 2017 11:45 am

On the visibility standpoint, I wear a yellow HiVis jacket. My bike is black/silver. In general I haven't really had any issues with not being seen. I suspect though that between the jacket and the coloring on the bike, people think I'm a motorcycle cop so they tend to be more aware of me.

I do have a headlight modulator currently connected to the low beams. I have it hooked up to a switch though so that I can disable it when I'm riding around town. I know they can be annoying to other drivers and as I said I haven't had any issues with being seen in traffic. I will turn it on when I'm out on the open road though or if I'm leading a group ride. I do think it helps with the visibility in those situations.
/dwight
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Re: The Invisible Motorcycle

Post by WingAdmin » Fri Sep 01, 2017 12:23 pm

dtrider wrote:
Fri Sep 01, 2017 11:45 am
On the visibility standpoint, I wear a yellow HiVis jacket. My bike is black/silver. In general I haven't really had any issues with not being seen. I suspect though that between the jacket and the coloring on the bike, people think I'm a motorcycle cop so they tend to be more aware of me.

I do have a headlight modulator currently connected to the low beams. I have it hooked up to a switch though so that I can disable it when I'm riding around town. I know they can be annoying to other drivers and as I said I haven't had any issues with being seen in traffic. I will turn it on when I'm out on the open road though or if I'm leading a group ride. I do think it helps with the visibility in those situations.
/dwight
Riding around town is when you need a headlight modulator the MOST! That's when people are most likely to pull out in front of you, at intersections, and so on. It's far less useful out on the open road, where there isn't much traffic.

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dtrider
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Re: The Invisible Motorcycle

Post by dtrider » Fri Sep 01, 2017 1:38 pm

WingAdmin wrote:
Fri Sep 01, 2017 12:23 pm
Riding around town is when you need a headlight modulator the MOST! That's when people are most likely to pull out in front of you, at intersections, and so on. It's far less useful out on the open road, where there isn't much traffic.
I hear what you are saying and I don't really disagree, but I don't fully agree either. Around town I'm part of the rest of the traffic flow and other people are already looking for traffic. Again, maybe it's because I kind of sort of resemble a motorcycle cop, but I've never had a problem with being seen in town.

Out on the open road though is another matter. Because there isn't much traffic I've found that people don't expect me to be there so they aren't looking. That's where the modulator does come in handy to catch their attention. Without the modulator I've had them pull out. With the modulator I've seen them start to pull out, then stop while I'm still quite a ways away.

It probably wouldn't hurt to use the modulator in town (other than annoying other drivers, but who cares), but it definitely helps to use it outside of town.
/dwight
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Re: The Invisible Motorcycle

Post by FM-USA » Tue Sep 05, 2017 9:31 pm

31 days ago I installed a pair of HIGH WATTS LED headlights on my 1500.
In the days before the install, I'd get 1 to half dozen "I didn't see you" drivers.
So this past 31 days there have been ZERO who didn't see me.

I can EASILY go into a rant on this and it be ALL for the good.. .. .. naw. Those of you who have LED lights know what I'm talk'n about.

They say, LOUD PIPES SAVES LIVES?
So to BRIGHT LEDS LIGHTS SAVES LIVES.

Mellencamp could rewrite the lyrics,... "He kids, I'm not invisible anymore". 8-)
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Re: The Invisible Motorcycle

Post by pixel288 » Tue Sep 05, 2017 10:57 pm

FM-USA: what kind of lights did you get?

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Re: The Invisible Motorcycle

Post by FM-USA » Wed Sep 06, 2017 7:07 am

pixel288 wrote:
Tue Sep 05, 2017 10:57 pm
FM-USA: what kind of lights did you get?
My headlights High Beam plate is broke loose? Can't be adjusted and is shooting too high.
I have a replacement.
_______________________________________________________________________

Here's a few photos I took this morning before sunrise. Pix below, bulbs installed are the 600W.
Lights look great here due to buildings, but 'on the road' there's a little less far reaching light.

MY OPINION,..
Halogens vs LEDS. The Leds should be about 200 watts for Low beam, add 150 watts for high beam.
300 watts all Leds on. This is comparing to the 55/65 halogens that were installed. Halo's had a more definitive beam spread.

The bulbs base can be turned 180*. Its pattern is that of an oval spotlight. On high beam there's little difference.
MIGHT work in the replacement H-Light with adjustments... just not today.
POWER DRAW. 55/65 Halogens drop my Amp meter 1/2 low to 1 volt high, the Leds negligible. :P
.






HOPE THIS HELPS
STAY TUNED...

I'll be installing LEDS in the corner lights. Should make a YUGE difference. ;)
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Re: The Invisible Motorcycle

Post by pixel288 » Wed Sep 06, 2017 10:19 am

Thanks loads! That gives me some food for thought.
Phil

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Re: The Invisible Motorcycle

Post by FM-USA » Wed Sep 06, 2017 1:57 pm

pixel288 wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 10:19 am
Thanks loads! That gives me some food for thought.
Phil
OOOOH, you're Canyahdian.
I understand that's a problem with your vehicle inspectors and LED lights.
Check with Dusty Boots, I think he's UP on circumventing your (SQUEAKY) rules. :twisted:
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Re: The Invisible Motorcycle

Post by Dark Angel » Thu Sep 07, 2017 3:17 pm

Run your brights during the day, recommended here by secretary of state in Illinois. Then aim them high. Everyone will see you, it is more blinding than the sun. My wife says she can see me over a mile away. I was skeptical until one morning going to work and trying to figure out what was on fire, or was there a meteor heading my way. It was another 2nd gen 1800 with brights on. I get flashed a lot during the day and always think, yep they see me.
The world is full of kings and queens who blind your eyes and steal your dreams it's heaven and hell. RJD

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Re: The Invisible Motorcycle

Post by Corkster52 » Thu Sep 07, 2017 4:37 pm

Dark Angel wrote:
Thu Sep 07, 2017 3:17 pm
Run your brights during the day, recommended here by secretary of state in Illinois. Then aim them high. Everyone will see you, it is more blinding than the sun.
Very interesting work around ;)

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Re: The Invisible Motorcycle

Post by FM-USA » Thu Sep 07, 2017 5:16 pm

Corkster52 wrote:
Thu Sep 07, 2017 4:37 pm
Dark Angel wrote:
Thu Sep 07, 2017 3:17 pm
Run your brights during the day, recommended here by secretary of state in Illinois. Then aim them high. Everyone will see you, it is more blinding than the sun.
Very interesting work around ;)
Only problem is if you might get a Barney Fife.
"Failure to dim lights to approaching vehicles" is a moving violation.
Sing it Johnny... "Chances are you'll wear a silly grin, when you walk into the courtroom".
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Re: The Invisible Motorcycle

Post by Corkster52 » Thu Sep 07, 2017 5:50 pm

FM-USA wrote:
Thu Sep 07, 2017 5:16 pm
.
Sing it Johnny... "Chances are you'll wear a silly grin, when you walk into the courtroom".
Too friggin funny! :lol:

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Re: The Invisible Motorcycle

Post by Kevin Ball » Thu Apr 12, 2018 9:07 am

WingAdmin wrote:
Thu Sep 10, 2009 9:10 pm
I honestly think the singular most valuable thing you can do is put a headlight modulator on your bike. I haven't put one on mine...yet. But every time I see a bike with one, it GRABS my attention.
Sadly here in the UK headlight modulators are illegal, reserved for the emergency services only

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Re: The Invisible Motorcycle

Post by AZgl1800 » Thu Apr 12, 2018 12:25 pm

Kevin Ball wrote:
Thu Apr 12, 2018 9:07 am
WingAdmin wrote:
Thu Sep 10, 2009 9:10 pm
I honestly think the singular most valuable thing you can do is put a headlight modulator on your bike. I haven't put one on mine...yet. But every time I see a bike with one, it GRABS my attention.
Sadly here in the UK headlight modulators are illegal, reserved for the emergency services only
I rode yesterday with Redbud, "Jim" for about 300 miles.
He has a headlight modulator on his bike, and I can tell you that when he was at an intersection waiting for traffic to stop, his headlight got the attention of oncoming drivers. they would move over to the left a bit to give him room.
~John

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Sadanorakman
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Re: The Invisible Motorcycle

Post by Sadanorakman » Fri Jul 13, 2018 4:59 am

redial wrote:
What I would like to see is a proper graduated system like is seen in England and other countries, that limits the size and capability of the bike you can ride as you gain experience. You could be limited to say a 250cc bike until you have a year of riding experience. I think we'd see a lot less accidents and fatalities as a result.


I can only partially agree... Our system still has issues that need addressing. It does go some way to stopping stupid 16yr olds killing themselves on inappropriate bikes, but can also make it much more dangerous for mature adult 'learner' riders.

I'm 46yrs old, English; born here, lived here all my life. We firstly have to pass compulsory basic training (CBT) before being let out on the road without supervision, and are then heavily restricted on horsepower (max 125cc, 11kw, 15hp) whilst riding on a provisional bike license and displaying mandatory 'L' (learner) plates.

The full bike test was one of the more challenging things I have completed in my adult life; it was really no cake-walk.

The examiner follows on a bike giving instructions via a radio link, there is a substantial ride, slow manoeuvring, emergency stops, and both a seperate computer-based theory test, and computer-based hazard-perception test using video footage which tests your reaction to situations.

There are technical riding elements tested such as turning the bike around in the road-width, which sounds really easy, but it's actually not because you are carefully judged on every step of the manoeuvre:

Initial observation, pulling away, additional observation before making the turn, making a controlled turn whilst continually observing, observation before and whilst coming to a controlled stop. Once you have achieved this minor feat, you can still fail if you forget to make a fresh observation before you move off again, even if that's only to move 6' to draw in alongside the curb! All of this has to be done in one continuous process, without putting a foot down, or travelling too far between each step... It all has to flow, and exude concise control and competence.

I started riding (properly) at the age of 33, by taking the aforementioned CBT, and then bought a 125cc to practice on for a few months, before taking a weekend of training on a 500cc bike and taking the 'direct access' route by taking my full bike test on that rented 500cc. If I hadn't taken the test on a 'larger' bike (which was only an option if you were minimum of 24 or 25 years old), then I would have been limited to riding a lower power bike for two years.

Prior to this I'd driven cars for 15 years, with six years covering many thousands of motorway miles with a job that involved long daily travel all over the UK, and trips to mainland Europe.

The one issue I had with the British motorcycle learning/testing regime when I went through it all was the bike power allowed on a provisional license for a mature adult. My 4-stroke 125cc would only do about 65mph flat-out, down-hill, with a following wind, and took a lifetime to reach that speed: This was downright DANGEROUS.

As a learner in the UK, you weren't allowed on the motorway (three and four lane free-ways), but could ride on two-lane 'dual-carriageways' (A-roads) which have a speed limit of 70mph.

I'd be riding a 20 mile stretch of dual-carriageway to my work, come up behind an HGV (semi) thats doing 50mph, and I just didn't have the power to safely overtake!!!

There would be cagers steaming past at 80mph, so I'd have to wait whilst patiently peering in my mirror for a massive gap to appear before gingerly venturing out into the second lane to pass the HGV... A process which I knew would leave me dangerously exposed for an unnecessarily extended amount of time.

Before many seconds there would be a car impatiently 'up my arse' trying to push me out of the way as quickly as possible so they could hammer-on past again at 80mph.

There's me on a tiny lightweight bike, being blown about in the turbulence next to the massive rotating wheels of a 30 ton wagon, with a moron in a cage seemingly a foot from my tail-light wishing they could do anything to blast me out of their way like a fighter-plane coming in on a strafing run.

...This was genuinely an ass-puckering experience which led me more-often-than-not to just follow the HGV for miles, sucking on its fumes... Better to die slowly through asphixiation or poisoning, than immediately by attempting a legal overtake!

Limiting the power of a bike therefore that a mature adult 'learner' can use in my opinion is genuinely dangerous!!!

Regards
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Re: The Invisible Motorcycle

Post by FM-USA » Fri Jul 13, 2018 7:44 am

Sadanorakman wrote:
Fri Jul 13, 2018 4:59 am
.. .. I'd be riding a 20 mile stretch of dual-carriageway to my work, come up behind an HGV (semi) thats doing 50mph, and I just didn't have the power to safely overtake!!!

There would be cagers steaming past at 80mph, so I'd have to wait whilst patiently peering in my mirror for a massive gap to appear before gingerly venturing out into the second lane to pass the HGV... A process which I knew would leave me dangerously exposed for an unnecessarily extended amount of time.

Before many seconds there would be a car impatiently 'up my arse' trying to push me out of the way as quickly as possible so they could hammer-on past again at 80mph.

There's me on a tiny lightweight bike, being blown about in the turbulence next to the massive rotating wheels of a 30 ton wagon, .. ..
Limiting the power of a bike therefore that a mature adult 'learner' can use in my opinion is genuinely dangerous!!!

Regards
This is the reason why US won't allow excessively small cars here.
Not enough power to keep up, is what our local DMV said.
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Re: The Invisible Motorcycle

Post by WingAdmin » Fri Jul 13, 2018 9:15 am

I totally agree with this. There are so many disadvantages of a motorcycle compared to a car on the road, in terms of safety. One of the big advantages is power to weight ratio, where a motorcycle can out-accelerate cars and quickly remove itself from harm's way. This advantage is totally nonexistent in low-powered bikes and scooters.

To me, scooters are the most dangerous vehicles on the road, far more than the 1000cc superbikes. I owned one for a while. I used to use it as a trackside "pit bike" when I crewed for a race team, I later licensed and plated it for the road. I think I ended up riding it on the road twice. Both times I felt utterly invisible to the traffic around me, as well as completely unable to get myself out of any kind of emergency situation due to the anemic acceleration. I ended up selling it.

I rode scooters extensively in Bermuda when I was working there, but it's very different - the speed limit there is 35 km/h (23 mph), and 90% of the traffic on the road is scooters, so people are used to seeing them, and car drivers EXPECT them to be there. It's also the only place I have ever split lanes - another normal, accepted practice there.



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