Special Tools for general/most maintenance?


Technical information and Q&A applicable to all years and models of Goldwings
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C-dub
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Special Tools for general/most maintenance?

Post by C-dub » Mon Jul 15, 2019 10:43 pm



I found this thread.
viewtopic.php?f=7&t=35400&p=273897&hili ... ls#p273897

That dhs website is still up and running. Very cool.

I've also been asking about lifts or jacks, mostly jacks, in another thread. It seems like what I thought I would get the most frequent use from a jack doesn't actually require one at all.

Since I am about to begin performing as much of my own regular maintenance as possible, I was curious about what any special tools that I will need. When I get the service manual I've read that it will tell me quite a bit. Is there anything ya'll can add to what it will tell me along these lines? I'm still wondering/debating the value of having a jack. I don't currently have the space for a table, so if I do anything in that area it will be a jack.


I am not and have never been a LEO. My avatar is in honor of my friend, Dallas Police Sargent Michael Smith, who was murdered along with four other officers in Dallas on 7.7.2016.

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Re: Special Tools for general/most maintenance?

Post by Andy Cote » Tue Jul 16, 2019 5:00 am

IMHO you should have a regular motorcycle jack. You can pick up a used one from local classified ads. Yes, most items can be done without but it's something you'll want at some point and better to have it in advance.

Your toolbox is probably already stocked. Normal handtools, metric wrenches, sockets and Allen wrenches. If you want to go up, Japanese screwdrivers in addition to regular Phillips; 3/8" drive hex/Allen wrenches (both short and long), flex sockets; flex head wrenches.

At least three different types of long nose pliers just to change the headlight bulbs.

Six to ten additional 10mm sockets. They are a single use item and you will lose one every time you work on the bike. Even changing the oil.

To move on to bigger things, the tools to rebuild forks and perhaps to replace the steering head bearings.

Decide if you want to mount your own tires. Spoons, levers, clamp, band-aids.

Lastly, this is the only tool to use for snap rings (pliers only create frustration and blood blisters):

https://www.amazon.com/GearWrench-2012D ... ef=sr_1_35


Last edited by Andy Cote on Tue Jul 16, 2019 5:21 am, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Special Tools for general/most maintenance?

Post by Andy Cote » Tue Jul 16, 2019 5:02 am

Of course you are probably already familiar with these specialized items.

DRILL PRESS: A tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching flat metal bar stock out of your hands so that it smacks you in the chest and flings your beer across the room, denting the freshly-painted vertical stabilizer which you had carefully set in the corner where nothing could get to it.

WIRE WHEEL: Cleans paint off bolts and then throws them somewhere under the workbench with the speed of light. Also removes fingerprints and hard-earned calluses from fingers in about the time it takes you to say, "Oh rats!"

HAMMER: Device for driving screws. Originally employed as a weapon of war. Also used as a kind of divining rod to locate expensive car parts not far from the object we are trying to hit.
SCREWDRIVER: Device for prying parts apart and scrapping off old gaskets.
PRY BAR: Used to reach under the workbench to get the lost bolts and parts.
SCRAPER: Primarily used to reduce blood pressure by donating a pint after slicing open your hand.
WORK GLOVES: Intended to prevent hand injuries by occupying space on top of tool box.
ELECTRIC HAND DRILL: Normally used for spinning pop rivets in their holes until you die of old age.

SKILL SAW: A portable cutting tool used to make studs too short.

BELT SANDER: An electric sanding tool commonly used to convert minor touch-up jobs into major refinishing jobs.

HACKSAW: One of a family of cutting tools built on the Ouija board principle. It transforms human energy into a crooked, unpredictable motion, and the more you attempt to influence its course, the more dismal your future becomes.

AVIATION METAL SNIPS: See hacksaw.
ELECTRIC RECIPRICATING SAW (aka SAWZALL): See hacksaw except faster.

PLIERS: Used to round off bolt heads. Primary implement in the creation of blood-blisters.

VISE-GRIPS: Generally used after pliers to completely round off bolt heads. If nothing else is available, they can also be used to transfer intense welding heat to the palm of your hand.

WELDING GLOVES: Heavy duty leather gloves used to prolong the conduction of intense welding heat to the palm of your hand.

OXYACETYLENE TORCH: Used almost entirely for lighting various flammable objects in your shop on fire. Also handy for igniting the grease inside the wheel hub you want the bearing race out of.

TABLE SAW: A large stationary power tool commonly used to launch wood projectiles for testing wall integrity.

HYDRAULIC FLOOR JACK: Used for lowering an automobile to the ground after you have installed your new brake shoes, trapping the jack handle firmly under the bumper.

EIGHT-FOOT LONG YELLOW PINE 2X4: Used for levering an automobile upward off of a trapped hydraulic jack handle.
CREEPER: A wheeled piece of garage furniture used to get under a vehicle in such a position that the part to be repaired is either too far or too close to reach with conventional tools.
EYEGLASSES: Decorative devices used by old, bold mechanics to blur images of objects that can then only be manipulated by feel.
TORQUE WRENCH: Expensive gift designed to weigh down the bottom drawer of the tool box.
UTILITY KNIFE: Bolder alternative to screwdriver for gasket and skin removal. Only used to open and slice through the contents of cardboard cartons containing convertible tops or tonneau covers. For other boxes use screwdriver.

E-Z Out Bolt and Stud Extractor: A tool that snaps off in bolt holes and is ten times harder than any known drill bit.

Timing Light: A stroboscopic instrument for illuminating grease buildup on crankshaft pulleys.

Two-Ton Hydraulic Engine Hoist: A handy tool for testing the tensile strength of ground straps and hydraulic clutch lines you have forgotten to disconnect.

Trouble Light: The mechanic's own tanning booth. Sometimes called a drop light, it is a good source of vitamin D, "the sunshine vitamin", which is not otherwise found under cars at night. Health benefits aside, its main purpose is to consume 40-watt light bulbs at about the same rate that 105-mm howitzer shells might be used during, say, the first few hours of the Battle of the Bulge. More often dark than light, its name is somewhat misleading.

Phillips Screwdriver: Normally used to stab the lids of old-style paper-and-tin oil cans and splash oil on your shirt; can also be used, as the name implies, to round off Phillips screw heads.

Air Compressor: A machine that takes energy produced in a coal-burning power plant 200 miles away and transforms it into compressed air that travels by hose to a Chicago Pneumatic impact wrench that grips rusty suspension bolts last tightened 40 years ago by someone in Abingdon, Oxfordshire, and rounds them off.

Grease Gun: A messy tool for checking to see if your zerk fittings are still plugged with rust.
DARKSIDE #1500
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Previously: GL1200 standard, GL1200 Interstate, GL1500 Goldwing, GL1500 Valkyrie Standard, 2000 Valkyrie Interstate, many other Hondas

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Re: Special Tools for general/most maintenance?

Post by C-dub » Tue Jul 16, 2019 5:06 pm

Andy Cote wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 5:02 am
Of course you are probably already familiar with these specialized items.
I am and fortunately do already have several of those items. Please feel free to send a more comprehensive list when you’re able to recall any others.

P.S. That is awesome! Ya’ll kill me sometimes.
I am not and have never been a LEO. My avatar is in honor of my friend, Dallas Police Sargent Michael Smith, who was murdered along with four other officers in Dallas on 7.7.2016.

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Re: Special Tools for general/most maintenance?

Post by Asphaltmaniac » Wed Jul 17, 2019 10:03 am

Service manual is your best tool too have. The second best tool is a willingness to study it. :)

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Re: Special Tools for general/most maintenance?

Post by C-dub » Thu Jul 18, 2019 4:28 pm

How about torque wrenches? I have one in ft/lbs. What about a smaller one in in/lbs? Are most measurements for torque specs in inches or foot pounds? The torque wrench I have is gotta be about 18 inches long. It might be too long for many uses and is also a 1/2" drive for the socket. That might be good for some stuff, but I'm thinking a 3/8" or even a 1/4" drive might be better for more things on a bike.
I am not and have never been a LEO. My avatar is in honor of my friend, Dallas Police Sargent Michael Smith, who was murdered along with four other officers in Dallas on 7.7.2016.

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Re: Special Tools for general/most maintenance?

Post by WingAdmin » Fri Jul 19, 2019 8:40 am

C-dub wrote:
Thu Jul 18, 2019 4:28 pm
How about torque wrenches? I have one in ft/lbs. What about a smaller one in in/lbs? Are most measurements for torque specs in inches or foot pounds? The torque wrench I have is gotta be about 18 inches long. It might be too long for many uses and is also a 1/2" drive for the socket. That might be good for some stuff, but I'm thinking a 3/8" or even a 1/4" drive might be better for more things on a bike.
I have both 1/2" and 3/8" drive torque wrenches. Both are calibrated in ft-lb, but the 1/2" drive wrench goes down to 10-15 ft-lb and the 3/8" drive wrench goes down to (if I recall correctly) more like 2 ft-lb.

That said, anything below 10-15 ft-lb I tend to use my built-in calibrated "goodandtight" torque wrench (i.e. my hand). After MANY years of doing this I have a pretty good feel for the correct torque for various fasteners.

However, if I am tightening a fastener into aluminum, I will use a torque wrench, every time.

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Re: Special Tools for general/most maintenance?

Post by oilboy1162 » Fri Jul 19, 2019 10:49 pm

Andy, you have spent WAY TOO much time working in your GOLDWING, and have figured out the real meaning of these tools!! God bless you brother, you have seen the light!!
:lol: I know people say we spend too much money on our rides, but I can't hear them when I'm 1000 miles away! :roll:

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Re: Special Tools for general/most maintenance?

Post by Andy Cote » Sat Jul 20, 2019 5:01 am

oilboy1162 wrote:
Fri Jul 19, 2019 10:49 pm
you have seen the light!!
And have the scars to prove it!
DARKSIDE #1500
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Previously: GL1200 standard, GL1200 Interstate, GL1500 Goldwing, GL1500 Valkyrie Standard, 2000 Valkyrie Interstate, many other Hondas

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Re: Special Tools for general/most maintenance?

Post by C-dub » Fri Aug 09, 2019 10:25 am

After researching a bit more on torque wrenches and visiting a couple of my local hardware stores I've almost definitely decided to order a couple eTork's off amazon. lol

The 1/2" drive one I have hasn't been used for at least 10 years and I didn't know anything about turning it down to the lowest setting or zero until now. It is probably about 30 years old and never been recalibrated. I've probably come no where near the number of uses, clicks, turns, or whatever to require recalibration. Just age and that I stored it 140 pound/ft. I can "check" it myself after reading some stuff hear and elsewhere on the interwebz, but recalibration can cost as much as just buying a new one.

Since that big one is the only one I have I figure I'll get a 1/4 & 3/8 pair that should work pretty well for quite a while without me needing anything with higher torque requirements. I'm still not even sure just how deep into this maintenance stuff I'm going to dive. I'm really liking that service manual, but it can be a little intimidating.

I am not a mechanic. I am not a mechanic. That was worth repeating. However, I am technical, but more on the science, biology, medical side of things. I also used to do electronics decades ago, so I can (I hope) still read technical manuals and wiring diagrams and understand what I'm reading. It might take some wading in the shallow end of things until I get that skill back, so we'll see.
I am not and have never been a LEO. My avatar is in honor of my friend, Dallas Police Sargent Michael Smith, who was murdered along with four other officers in Dallas on 7.7.2016.

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Re: Special Tools for general/most maintenance?

Post by Scooter363y » Wed Aug 14, 2019 9:15 pm

I would say what tools you need are dependent on what maintenance you want to do. Right off for starters I would get:

Wrench set along with a couple of adjustable wrenches
A screwdriver set. Get some jis screwdrivers
Set of mixed pliers
Socket set. 3/8 and 1/4 are what I use most. And a selection of 1/2 (for big items wheels,axels,etc)
Allen wrenches and Allen sockets
Just for piece of mind torque wrenches, you are going to be mostly tightening bolts into aluminum both 3/8 and 1/2
Electric meter and test light.

Most important buy a good (Honda) service manual

That would start you off with the basics.

Advanced tools:
Motorcycle lift,timing light,bearing pullers,chain breakers etc

Ride safe
Scooter

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Re: Special Tools for general/most maintenance?

Post by C-dub » Thu Aug 15, 2019 7:12 pm

Scooter363y wrote:
Wed Aug 14, 2019 9:15 pm
I would say what tools you need are dependent on what maintenance you want to do. Right off for starters I would get:

Wrench set along with a couple of adjustable wrenches



A screwdriver set. Get some jis screwdrivers



Set of mixed pliers



Socket set. 3/8 and 1/4 are what I use most. And a selection of 1/2 (for big items wheels,axels,etc)



Allen wrenches and Allen sockets



Just for piece of mind torque wrenches, you are going to be mostly tightening bolts into aluminum both 3/8 and 1/2
Electric meter



test light.

Most important buy a good (Honda) service manual




That would start you off with the basics.

Advanced tools:
Motorcycle lift,timing light,bearing pullers,chain breakers etc

Ride safe
Scooter
I have a good selection of sockets, but there might be the odd size I don't have yet.
Torque wrenches are next on my list to get.
I've looked at a lift and might do that within the next year. Maybe for Christmas this year at the earliest.
We'll see about the timing light and bearing pullers if I get that deep into things.

I hate to ask about these next two things because I might be showing too much ignorance and worried about how many of ya'll will be shaking your heads. However, here it goes. What is a test light and chain breakers for? Is test light for the same thing a meter is for? Chain breakers are for timing chains?
I am not and have never been a LEO. My avatar is in honor of my friend, Dallas Police Sargent Michael Smith, who was murdered along with four other officers in Dallas on 7.7.2016.

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Re: Special Tools for general/most maintenance?

Post by Scooter363y » Thu Aug 15, 2019 8:43 pm

Just to clear things up

When you just want to check a circuit for power a test light can work much quicker than a meter.

If you get good at it friends will want you to work on their motorcycle 🏍 not everyone has a wing so. You might need other tools.

Honda also makes a general maintaince manual. Not for any specific model but it explains how to do many procedures well worth the money. I hear many people complain about the cost of a genuine Honda manual. I wouldn't get a clymer or Hanes unless I couldn't get a factory one or Needed to prop a door open.

I worked in motorcycle industry for about 8 years most of it as a mechanic. Roadraced and drag raced for years. I tried once to inventory tools and stopped before I got out of the top box! Way too much invested for what the shops are paying.

Ride safe
Scooter

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Re: Special Tools for general/most maintenance?

Post by Andy Cote » Fri Aug 16, 2019 6:36 am

I now have three lifts: traditional MC jack, lift table, Pit Bull jack. I bought each of them used from local classifieds for about half of the best price I could find new.

Somethings like bearing pullers and drivers can be borrowed from local auto parts stores if you only need them once in a great while.

Back to my post on the snap ring tool. I might go years without using it but I still recommend it. Traditional snap ring pliers are nasty - blood blisters every time. This thing is great, not only for preventing blisters but being able to hold everything and easily move the snap ring around.

One other thing that might prove helpful, A magnetic reach tool. We all know the Goldwing is infamous for swallowing bolts and nuts into bottomless pits of darkness. Maybe one in ten can be recovered if you're lucky. Another reason to buy 10mm sockets by the dozen.
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Previously: GL1200 standard, GL1200 Interstate, GL1500 Goldwing, GL1500 Valkyrie Standard, 2000 Valkyrie Interstate, many other Hondas

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Re: Special Tools for general/most maintenance?

Post by C-dub » Sat Aug 17, 2019 6:52 pm

I have the little flexy extendable magnet tool.

I don't have a snap ring remover tool, but still haven't gone through my father in law's tools. He passed away and left me a BUNCH of tools that my mother in law hasn't decided what to do with yet. It's tough because he had a huge amount of tools and many specialty things. There's gotta be at least one snap ring remover in there somewhere.
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Re: Special Tools for general/most maintenance?

Post by seelyark1 » Sun Sep 08, 2019 5:52 pm

Put in a bid with your MIL. Try to keep those tools, you will never regret it. And you can bet there are snap ring pliers in there some where. Let me tell you, you will never have too many tools. I have people show up for me to fix things only because they know that I have tools. Many sent by my grown up kids...
Ride safe, and smart. Asphalt is like #1 grit sandpaper. Dave

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Re: Special Tools for general/most maintenance?

Post by C-dub » Sun Sep 08, 2019 8:01 pm

seelyark1 wrote:
Sun Sep 08, 2019 5:52 pm
Put in a bid with your MIL. Try to keep those tools, you will never regret it. And you can bet there are snap ring pliers in there some where. Let me tell you, you will never have too many tools. I have people show up for me to fix things only because they know that I have tools. Many sent by my grown up kids...
I'm sure I will be able to have whatever I'd like to keep and have space to keep. The key factor at this time is space. I also kept many of my dad's tools after he passed last year. Not too many that are helpful for the bike, but a few and a couple I remember from my youth. Although, no real specialty tools. Some of his stuff was better than things I already had and some not.
I am not and have never been a LEO. My avatar is in honor of my friend, Dallas Police Sargent Michael Smith, who was murdered along with four other officers in Dallas on 7.7.2016.

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Re: Special Tools for general/most maintenance?

Post by DonnyBrook » Sun Sep 22, 2019 7:29 pm

Trim And Molding Tool Set - Harbor Freight around $10 -- Makes getting panels off without hurting them easier.
Not so special, but an Air Compressor is a must have.
Lots of metric stuff!
and a Luggage Scale - the kind that you lift stuff up with to weigh.

And there's more, and more, and ….

Ya can't have too many tools, too much rope, or too much money!

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Re: Special Tools for general/most maintenance?

Post by C-dub » Sun Sep 22, 2019 7:45 pm

DonnyBrook wrote:
Sun Sep 22, 2019 7:29 pm
Trim And Molding Tool Set - Harbor Freight around $10 -- Makes getting panels off without hurting them easier.
That is a great idea. Thanks
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Re: Special Tools for general/most maintenance?

Post by Corkster52 » Mon Oct 21, 2019 4:18 pm

Andy Cote wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 5:00 am

Lastly, this is the only tool to use for snap rings (pliers only create frustration and blood blisters):

https://www.amazon.com/GearWrench-2012D ... ef=sr_1_35

k-d tools snap ring tool.jpg
Believe it or not, just the other day I found a new use for this tool. Neighbor lady had tried to take out the bottom of a light bulb from a hanging lamp in her dining room and could not get a good grip on it with needle-nosed pliers. This tool grabbed it perfectly!

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Re: Special Tools for general/most maintenance?

Post by Corkster52 » Mon Oct 21, 2019 4:25 pm

DonnyBrook wrote:
Sun Sep 22, 2019 7:29 pm

Ya can't have too many tools, too much rope, or too much money!
So very true!

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Re: Special Tools for general/most maintenance?

Post by saganaga » Wed Oct 30, 2019 9:53 pm

About the most unique specialized tool I use regularly for maintenance is a 1/4" T-handle wrench with a 8mm, 10mm and 12mm socket. Not needed, but it is a time saver. The sockets attach to each end and the middle of the "T", and can be swapped around as needed. Between the three, it covers most of the fasteners on a bike.

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Re: Special Tools for general/most maintenance?

Post by WingAdmin » Thu Oct 31, 2019 1:13 pm

I have a tool just like this one:





https://www.amazon.com/Multibit-ADJUSTA ... ref=sr_1_3

It's meant as a screwdriver, but it is ratcheting. I rarely use it as a screwdriver. I put a hex-to-square drive bit in it like this:





https://www.amazon.com/TIMESETL-Impact- ... ref=sr_1_6

I use this for working with most of the 10mm-sized bolts on the Goldwing. It's fast and easy, you can get good torque with it folded over to tighten and break free the fasteners, and you can straighten it out and use it as a screwdriver to zip fasteners in and out quickly.

I also have a set of hex bits and Torx bits that go into it.



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