Restoration started


Information and questions on GL1000 Goldwings (1975-1979)
  • Sponsored Links
User avatar
Wirelic
Posts: 28
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2018 10:11 am
Location: Green Bay, WI
Motorcycle: 1978 GL1000
1986 Suzuki Cavalcade
1977 Triumph 750 Bonneville
1978 GL1000 Goldwing
Previous: 1969 Honda CL450
1981 Yamaha Virago 920
1965 Honda 150
1967 Triumph Mountain Cub

Restoration started

Post by Wirelic » Sun Aug 11, 2019 7:27 pm



Hello All,

I introduced myself a week or so back. I just inherited a 1978 GL1000 very much in need of a fair amount of work. It has a Vetter fairing and saddle bags and a trunk(trunk is removed in pics). Of course the gas tank is rusty, carbs gummed up, both brakes systems need to be rebuilt, new brake lines, tires. Rear shocks are toast. Bike has a bit over 50K miles on it.

So, I pulled off all the luggage and started at the rear so I can remove the gas tank. Removed shocks, fender, inner fender, loosened the shelter, removed side covers, seat, petcock, fuel line, fuel filter, rear master cylinder. I do have the tank almost removed, but there were several times where that seemed physically impossible, just not enough space. Now, however, I’m confident I’ll get it removed. Not sure if it’ll go back in, though.

One thing I’m wondering about is when I line the tank, or seal it, after dealing with the rust, how have you guys dealt with the internal lines to the petcock? How have you kept them clear or free of tank sealer?

I’ll try to keep you updated as to my progress. Any suggestions or tips will be greatly appreciated
Attachments









User avatar
SnoBrdr
Posts: 752
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2014 9:01 am
Location: Providence, Rhode Island
Motorcycle: 1978 GL 1000

131K Original Owner

Re: Restoration started

Post by SnoBrdr » Mon Aug 12, 2019 12:34 pm

Wirelic wrote:
Sun Aug 11, 2019 7:27 pm
Hello All,

I introduced myself a week or so back. I just inherited a 1978 GL1000 very much in need of a fair amount of work. It has a Vetter fairing and saddle bags and a trunk(trunk is removed in pics). Of course the gas tank is rusty, carbs gummed up, both brakes systems need to be rebuilt, new brake lines, tires. Rear shocks are toast. Bike has a bit over 50K miles on it.

So, I pulled off all the luggage and started at the rear so I can remove the gas tank. Removed shocks, fender, inner fender, loosened the shelter, removed side covers, seat, petcock, fuel line, fuel filter, rear master cylinder. I do have the tank almost removed, but there were several times where that seemed physically impossible, just not enough space. Now, however, I’m confident I’ll get it removed. Not sure if it’ll go back in, though.

One thing I’m wondering about is when I line the tank, or seal it, after dealing with the rust, how have you guys dealt with the internal lines to the petcock? How have you kept them clear or free of tank sealer?

I’ll try to keep you updated as to my progress. Any suggestions or tips will be greatly appreciated
I used Por 15 when I coated my tank.

Has worked well for me.

People use guitar strings or similar attached to a drill to clean out the internal gas tank lines.

User avatar
Wirelic
Posts: 28
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2018 10:11 am
Location: Green Bay, WI
Motorcycle: 1978 GL1000
1986 Suzuki Cavalcade
1977 Triumph 750 Bonneville
1978 GL1000 Goldwing
Previous: 1969 Honda CL450
1981 Yamaha Virago 920
1965 Honda 150
1967 Triumph Mountain Cub

Re: Restoration started

Post by Wirelic » Mon Aug 12, 2019 2:12 pm

Thanks, Snobdr. Still haven’t made a final decision as to how I’ll deal with this.

User avatar
SnoBrdr
Posts: 752
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2014 9:01 am
Location: Providence, Rhode Island
Motorcycle: 1978 GL 1000

131K Original Owner

Re: Restoration started

Post by SnoBrdr » Mon Aug 12, 2019 2:17 pm

Wirelic wrote:
Mon Aug 12, 2019 2:12 pm
Thanks, Snobdr. Still haven’t made a final decision as to how I’ll deal with this.
There are as many ways/answers as you could imagine.

I took what I thought was the easiest route for me.

User avatar
dingdong
Posts: 3710
Joined: Thu Apr 08, 2010 8:35 am
Location: Oklahoma City
Motorcycle: 1976 gl1000
1993 gl1500A
2004 NRX1800 Rune SOLD

Re: Restoration started

Post by dingdong » Mon Aug 12, 2019 2:49 pm

I also used Por 15. Followed the directions carefully and there were no clogged lines or screen.
Tom

"Molon Labe"

John F. Kennedy would be impeached by todays liberal Democratic socialist party.

User avatar
Wirelic
Posts: 28
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2018 10:11 am
Location: Green Bay, WI
Motorcycle: 1978 GL1000
1986 Suzuki Cavalcade
1977 Triumph 750 Bonneville
1978 GL1000 Goldwing
Previous: 1969 Honda CL450
1981 Yamaha Virago 920
1965 Honda 150
1967 Triumph Mountain Cub

Re: Restoration started

Post by Wirelic » Mon Aug 12, 2019 5:07 pm





Thanks guys. Today I did get the gas tank out, but I did have to pull the rear drive. I’d removed the rear master cylinder and everything else, but it was physically impossible to get the tank out without pulling the drive off. I know some say it’s not necessary, but it as a must in my case. No big deal, I’m glad I pulled it. It needs to be cleaned up, checked and greased anyway.

I did find the electrical connector between the stator and everything else burned thru today. It’s a wonder the previous owner didn’t get stranded on the road someplace.
Attachments





User avatar
smittyboy734
Posts: 32
Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2016 7:21 am
Location: trenton,mi.usa
Motorcycle: 1978 gl1000..owner 70 cl70 .previously owned 81cb750k,76 cb500T ,78 kz650,71 H1500

Re: Restoration started

Post by smittyboy734 » Sat Aug 17, 2019 4:28 pm

when i restored my 78 i used vinegar in the tank let it sit for a couple weeks while i was dealing with all the other stuff, it turned out clean as a whistle,and have done it to other tanks since if you have the time it works well

User avatar
rudolphwolven
Posts: 107
Joined: Fri Jun 20, 2014 7:05 am
Location: Netherlands - Utrecht
Motorcycle: 1975 GL1000 K1

Re: Restoration started

Post by rudolphwolven » Thu Aug 22, 2019 5:55 pm

***
During restoration in 2016 of my 1975 GL1000 K1/11.000 mls; OEM seat & muffler; OEM/original painted panels,
I derusted my 31 year old fueltank with:
1) Main derusting:........... Pure cleaning vinegar (containing 8% acetic acid conform European Norm....Table vinegar is different and has 4%).........approx. 20 x 1 ltr. treating the tank's inside for a couple of weeks.......
2) Second derusting for remaining rust spots:..........Fertan 22220 Water Based Rust Converter Spray 250ml Non-Toxic Made in Germany poured into the tank and rinsed thoroughly in all directions....(I did not use the spray pistol of course)
3) Rinse the perfect derusted tank (now has a blanc grey metal inside wall) with a lot of clear water and dry it with some (hair)dryer.......
4) Mix the Tapox (415 gram) with TX-10 (125 gram) , forming a 2-component coating, pour it in the tank (all openings closed) and move tank thoroughly in any possible horizontal, vertical, 360 degr. direction to cover / coat the inner side of the tank..........pour out the remaining liquid......
After drying a beautiful red-brown inner coating of the tank is realised.
5) Advise: ..........I did a new rattle-can ground- and finish coating for the outside of the tank
REMARK: do not forget to let the cleaning vinegar and coating treatments enter the two fuel lines inside the tank......

Image

Image

Image

Image























Attachments


Proud winner of the NGWClub-USA contest Bike of the Year 2016--Image

User avatar
Wirelic
Posts: 28
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2018 10:11 am
Location: Green Bay, WI
Motorcycle: 1978 GL1000
1986 Suzuki Cavalcade
1977 Triumph 750 Bonneville
1978 GL1000 Goldwing
Previous: 1969 Honda CL450
1981 Yamaha Virago 920
1965 Honda 150
1967 Triumph Mountain Cub

Re: Restoration started

Post by Wirelic » Fri Aug 23, 2019 5:17 am

Hi Rudolph,

Thank you for your very detailed report on de-rusting your fuel tank. I really appreciate all the details and excellent photos. I do clean a lot of tanks in my restoration business, but I’ve never done one with internal screens and lines so I was a little concerned. I have done the vinegar soaking, but that has never worked well for me. Probably because of the type of vinegar that’s available around here.

What I have found that works is using a product called EvapoRust, which is environmentally safe. I put a couple gallons of that in the tank and let it soak for a week or so, turning and rotating the tank several times a day. This product is also reusable, which helps save some money. After draining that, I rinse very thoroughly with water and dry with a heat gun. I then slosh around in the tank a pint or so of acetone. I drain and let dry. And, with the Goldwing I have made sure both products ran through the internal fuel lines, evenblowing them out with compressed air.

My final coating is Caswell 2 part epoxy fuel tank sealer. It’s ethanol proof and forms an excellent liner/sealer. Like you, I spent almost an entire hour turning and rotating the tank slowly in all directions, making sure every surface inside the tank was coated. I blew compressed air thru the fuel lines about every 5 minutes throughout this process, keeping the lines and screens open. This has yielded and excellent looking job! But only time will tell the final results, but many have been having great success with this product. One other thing I like about the Caswell epoxy is that it’s practically odorless. None of the harsh oders like many other products.

On a side note, I had read on one of forums about de-rusting a tank by filling it with a saltwater solution, installing a heavy bolt as in electrode and connecting it to a battery charger. I tried this method and found that it did nothing for my Goldwing tank. It did dissolve a 12” log spike and pumped out mountains of brown/green foam that made a big mess. But after several days and rinsing out the tank, I found all the rust was still there. One can’t believe all you read on the internet!

Congrats on your Wing! It’s beautiful! I haven’t yet decided if I’ll restore and keep this Wing or restore and sell it. I guess that depends on how it feels after I get it done and start riding it.

User avatar
Wirelic
Posts: 28
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2018 10:11 am
Location: Green Bay, WI
Motorcycle: 1978 GL1000
1986 Suzuki Cavalcade
1977 Triumph 750 Bonneville
1978 GL1000 Goldwing
Previous: 1969 Honda CL450
1981 Yamaha Virago 920
1965 Honda 150
1967 Triumph Mountain Cub

Re: Restoration started

Post by Wirelic » Fri Aug 23, 2019 5:23 am

Here’s a pic of the Caswell product I used on my Goldwing tank. It comes in several colors and clear. I used the Dragon Blood Red, which really helps to see that I get full products coverage inside the tank.
Attachments



User avatar
DenverWinger
Posts: 1028
Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2011 2:20 pm
Location: Denver, CO
Motorcycle: (s)
1980 GL1100 STD Vetter (2005-)
1993 GL1500 Aspencade (2017-)
1983 Trav-Lite Camper (2010-)
Past rides
1972 CL350 (1980-1988) sold
1978 Suzuki GS550 (1985-2005) sold
1977 GL1000 (2002-2006) sold

Re: Restoration started

Post by DenverWinger » Fri Aug 23, 2019 6:15 am

Very impressed by the tank restoration jobs there!
Wirelic wrote:
Fri Aug 23, 2019 5:17 am
On a side note, I had read on one of forums about de-rusting a tank by filling it with a saltwater solution, installing a heavy bolt as in electrode and connecting it to a battery charger. I tried this method and found that it did nothing for my Goldwing tank. It did dissolve a 12” log spike and pumped out mountains of brown/green foam that made a big mess. But after several days and rinsing out the tank, I found all the rust was still there. One can’t believe all you read on the internet!
Electrolysis is effective and works... If it dissolved the spike you had the battery charger polarity backwards, otherwise rust in the tank would have dissolved instead of the spike and the spike got bigger instead of smaller..... :D Just sayin' :lol:

When I was a little kid I used to play with that, put a dime and a penny in salt water and hook a 9v transistor battery to them, in one polarity you'd get a silver-colored penny and the dime wouldn't change, in the other polarity you'd get a copper-colored dime, the dime unchanged. This is electroplating. So you actually added log spike metal to the inside of the tank.

Thought just occurs to me, once the tank is de-rusted, theoretically you could then reverse the polarity and use a copper rod instead of the log spike, and copper-plate the inside of the tank. THAT wouldn't rust! :idea: :idea:
♫ 99 Little Bugs in the Code, ♪
♪ 99 Bugs in the Code. ♫ :(
♫ Take one down, Patch it around, ♪
♫ 127 Little Bugs in the Code. ♫ ♪ :shock:

~Mark

User avatar
Wirelic
Posts: 28
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2018 10:11 am
Location: Green Bay, WI
Motorcycle: 1978 GL1000
1986 Suzuki Cavalcade
1977 Triumph 750 Bonneville
1978 GL1000 Goldwing
Previous: 1969 Honda CL450
1981 Yamaha Virago 920
1965 Honda 150
1967 Triumph Mountain Cub

Re: Restoration started

Post by Wirelic » Fri Aug 23, 2019 7:09 am

You’re comments prove one can’t believe everything we read on line. I hooked up my tank exactly as the writer had said. He said positive side of battery charger to electrode and negative to the tank. That’s how I did it.
Not to disagree with you, but I saw no change to the internal of my tank. I think the dissolved electrode ended up outside the tank in the mountains of green foam. My guess is maybe the water I used thru off the process as it had high mineral content. Maybe I should have used distilled water.

But, I appreciate your comments and observations. Too late I find out I coulda had a copper lined tank! How cool that would be!

User avatar
Wirelic
Posts: 28
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2018 10:11 am
Location: Green Bay, WI
Motorcycle: 1978 GL1000
1986 Suzuki Cavalcade
1977 Triumph 750 Bonneville
1978 GL1000 Goldwing
Previous: 1969 Honda CL450
1981 Yamaha Virago 920
1965 Honda 150
1967 Triumph Mountain Cub

Re: Restoration started

Post by Wirelic » Mon Aug 26, 2019 1:51 pm

In case anyone is reading this,I completed sealing my gas tank last week and it turned out very good. All surfaces had a nice coating on them. I especially like the fact that the epoxy is almost scent free, no suffocating lacquer type oder.

After the inside of the tank was done, I sanded and primed the exterior then applied 2 coats of gloss black epoxy paint to the outside. While that was drying I turned my attention to the rear wheel. I am working to strip the cloudy clear coat of the aluminum wheel. What a bear of a job since I don’t have, at the moment, the correct liquid stripper. Anyone have a recommendation?

I’ve read on these forums that if the clear coat is stripped off, the wheels must be polished every week. I’m not worried about that because when I was trucking and had my own Peterbilt, it had aluminum wheels (10 of them), aluminum fuel tanks and aluminum battery box and steps- all of which was NOT clear coated. I ran year round thru rain, sand, slush, snow, dirt & road grime. I’d run between 10K-12K miles a month. I polished the aluminum maybe once a month,yet it always looked great.

Anyway, where I’ve removed the coating on my Goldwinf wheel and polished it, it gleams like new chrome.

User avatar
Maz
Posts: 673
Joined: Tue May 19, 2015 4:43 am
Location: Kent, UK
Motorcycle: 1975 GL1000K1
1976 CB500T
1979 CB750L
1990 Yamaha FJ1200
1993 Suzuki GS500E

Re: Restoration started

Post by Maz » Tue Aug 27, 2019 4:26 am

Wirelic wrote:
Mon Aug 26, 2019 1:51 pm
In case anyone is reading this,I completed sealing my gas tank last week and it turned out very good. All surfaces had a nice coating on them. I especially like the fact that the epoxy is almost scent free, no suffocating lacquer type oder.

After the inside of the tank was done, I sanded and primed the exterior then applied 2 coats of gloss black epoxy paint to the outside. While that was drying I turned my attention to the rear wheel. I am working to strip the cloudy clear coat of the aluminum wheel. What a bear of a job since I don’t have, at the moment, the correct liquid stripper. Anyone have a recommendation?

I’ve read on these forums that if the clear coat is stripped off, the wheels must be polished every week. I’m not worried about that because when I was trucking and had my own Peterbilt, it had aluminum wheels (10 of them), aluminum fuel tanks and aluminum battery box and steps- all of which was NOT clear coated. I ran year round thru rain, sand, slush, snow, dirt & road grime. I’d run between 10K-12K miles a month. I polished the aluminum maybe once a month,yet it always looked great.

Anyway, where I’ve removed the coating on my Goldwinf wheel and polished it, it gleams like new chrome.
I had the rims on my '75 GL1000 professionally polished, 3 years ago, to remove the old greying surface. They came out really nice and I only polish/wax them every few months and they still look brand new. The cost for polishing both was £60 (UK) and was money well spent!

Maz
Attachments


Ironically, Common Sense is the LEAST common of all senses!

User avatar
rudolphwolven
Posts: 107
Joined: Fri Jun 20, 2014 7:05 am
Location: Netherlands - Utrecht
Motorcycle: 1975 GL1000 K1

Re: Restoration started

Post by rudolphwolven » Tue Aug 27, 2019 6:08 am

Hi Maz,
That's a very nice Goldwing.........congratulations!
Proud winner of the NGWClub-USA contest Bike of the Year 2016--Image

User avatar
Maz
Posts: 673
Joined: Tue May 19, 2015 4:43 am
Location: Kent, UK
Motorcycle: 1975 GL1000K1
1976 CB500T
1979 CB750L
1990 Yamaha FJ1200
1993 Suzuki GS500E

Re: Restoration started

Post by Maz » Tue Aug 27, 2019 6:44 am

rudolphwolven wrote:
Tue Aug 27, 2019 6:08 am
Hi Maz,
That's a very nice Goldwing.........congratulations!
Thanks, Rudolph......Not a patch on yours, but not too shabby!

Maz
Ironically, Common Sense is the LEAST common of all senses!

User avatar
Wirelic
Posts: 28
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2018 10:11 am
Location: Green Bay, WI
Motorcycle: 1978 GL1000
1986 Suzuki Cavalcade
1977 Triumph 750 Bonneville
1978 GL1000 Goldwing
Previous: 1969 Honda CL450
1981 Yamaha Virago 920
1965 Honda 150
1967 Triumph Mountain Cub

Re: Restoration started

Post by Wirelic » Tue Aug 27, 2019 8:44 am

Max,

Your Wing is a beautiful bike! Thank you so much for sharing it with us. I do have another question, or maybe an opinion poll. If you look back at my photos you’ll see my Wing comes with a Vetter fairing and some other brand of hard bags and a trunk. I think they were factory installed back in the day, but, to me, the appearance isn’t the best. So my question to all is do you think I should keep the fairing and hard luggage or restore the bike without those parts? Personally, I haven’t decided yet. I appreciate all recommendations. Below is pic of original bike as I received it and a shot of the battery box when I got the bike. It matches much of the rest of the bike.
Attachments





User avatar
SnoBrdr
Posts: 752
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2014 9:01 am
Location: Providence, Rhode Island
Motorcycle: 1978 GL 1000

131K Original Owner

Re: Restoration started

Post by SnoBrdr » Tue Aug 27, 2019 9:30 am

Wirelic wrote:
Tue Aug 27, 2019 8:44 am
Max,

Your Wing is a beautiful bike! Thank you so much for sharing it with us. I do have another question, or maybe an opinion poll. If you look back at my photos you’ll see my Wing comes with a Vetter fairing and some other brand of hard bags and a trunk. I think they were factory installed back in the day, but, to me, the appearance isn’t the best. So my question to all is do you think I should keep the fairing and hard luggage or restore the bike without those parts? Personally, I haven’t decided yet. I appreciate all recommendations. Below is pic of original bike as I received it and a shot of the battery box when I got the bike. It matches much of the rest of the bike.
There was no such thing as "factory installed" bags during this period.

Each dealer sold/installed whatever they wanted.

The closest to "factory installed" were the ones I have on my bike.

They are branded as HondaLine but they are actually made by Samsonite.

Similar looking bags were also sold by Krauser and another company which I forget.

The good thing about the Hondaline type bags/suitcases is that they detach from the bike leaving only a smallish sized frame to be seen.

User avatar
Wirelic
Posts: 28
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2018 10:11 am
Location: Green Bay, WI
Motorcycle: 1978 GL1000
1986 Suzuki Cavalcade
1977 Triumph 750 Bonneville
1978 GL1000 Goldwing
Previous: 1969 Honda CL450
1981 Yamaha Virago 920
1965 Honda 150
1967 Triumph Mountain Cub

Re: Restoration started

Post by Wirelic » Tue Aug 27, 2019 9:56 am

Thanks for your info. I’m not sure of the manufacturer of my bags, I may be able to find a name on them somewhere. I thought that they might have been an option available at the time, before Honda was making their own. And, in my case, there is sooooo much mounting hardware and bracketry and complex fasteners, I figured it was a factory job. I don’t doubt you, but it’s hard for me to picture a dealer having all that hardware available. It’s almost like a set of kids monkey bars was installed to hold the luggage.

User avatar
SnoBrdr
Posts: 752
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2014 9:01 am
Location: Providence, Rhode Island
Motorcycle: 1978 GL 1000

131K Original Owner

Re: Restoration started

Post by SnoBrdr » Tue Aug 27, 2019 10:02 am

Wirelic wrote:
Tue Aug 27, 2019 9:56 am
Thanks for your info. I’m not sure of the manufacturer of my bags, I may be able to find a name on them somewhere. I thought that they might have been an option available at the time, before Honda was making their own. And, in my case, there is sooooo much mounting hardware and bracketry and complex fasteners, I figured it was a factory job. I don’t doubt you, but it’s hard for me to picture a dealer having all that hardware available. It’s almost like a set of kids monkey bars was installed to hold the luggage.
Your bags look like they could be Bates but many similar looking bags were sold.

As far as the hardware, it came with when you bought the bags.

It wasn't just slapped together with spare parts.

User avatar
Wirelic
Posts: 28
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2018 10:11 am
Location: Green Bay, WI
Motorcycle: 1978 GL1000
1986 Suzuki Cavalcade
1977 Triumph 750 Bonneville
1978 GL1000 Goldwing
Previous: 1969 Honda CL450
1981 Yamaha Virago 920
1965 Honda 150
1967 Triumph Mountain Cub

Re: Restoration started

Post by Wirelic » Tue Aug 27, 2019 10:31 am

No, this bag setup was definitely not “slapped together”. There a lot of chrome metal tubing, rails, special bolts and even black metal “splash guards” that mount next to the wheel to protect the bags from wheel spray.

User avatar
Maz
Posts: 673
Joined: Tue May 19, 2015 4:43 am
Location: Kent, UK
Motorcycle: 1975 GL1000K1
1976 CB500T
1979 CB750L
1990 Yamaha FJ1200
1993 Suzuki GS500E

Re: Restoration started

Post by Maz » Tue Aug 27, 2019 11:27 am

This has to be a personal choice. What are you going to use the bike for when it's finished? If you plan on long trips, maybe with a passenger, then you'll undoubtedly see the benefit of the luggage space. If just using it for fun rides and day trips, you probably won't use the luggage capacity.
Personally (and this is purely personal and not meant to offend anyone) I can't stand fairings, boxes and side cases, so I would get rid. I did this very thing with my CB750L and got £500 on eBay for the lot ....... I only paid £435 for the bike with all that stuff on it!
Maz
Ironically, Common Sense is the LEAST common of all senses!

User avatar
SnoBrdr
Posts: 752
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2014 9:01 am
Location: Providence, Rhode Island
Motorcycle: 1978 GL 1000

131K Original Owner

Re: Restoration started

Post by SnoBrdr » Tue Aug 27, 2019 11:35 am

Maz wrote:
Tue Aug 27, 2019 11:27 am
This has to be a personal choice. What are you going to use the bike for when it's finished? If you plan on long trips, maybe with a passenger, then you'll undoubtedly see the benefit of the luggage space. If just using it for fun rides and day trips, you probably won't use the luggage capacity.
Personally (and this is purely personal and not meant to offend anyone) I can't stand fairings, boxes and side cases, so I would get rid. I did this very thing with my CB750L and got £500 on eBay for the lot ....... I only paid £435 for the bike with all that stuff on it!
Maz
I use my bags on a almost daily basis.

How do you go to the market on a bike without bags?

Since my bike is basically all I use 7 months of the year, it does matter to me.

User avatar
Wirelic
Posts: 28
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2018 10:11 am
Location: Green Bay, WI
Motorcycle: 1978 GL1000
1986 Suzuki Cavalcade
1977 Triumph 750 Bonneville
1978 GL1000 Goldwing
Previous: 1969 Honda CL450
1981 Yamaha Virago 920
1965 Honda 150
1967 Triumph Mountain Cub

Re: Restoration started

Post by Wirelic » Tue Aug 27, 2019 2:29 pm

Thanks, guys. I’m leaning toward keeping them, even though I think they detract from the bikes appearance. I do already have a bagger, but I plan to use the Wing for touring also. And your point is well taken about even going to the store for a few things would be much easier with some luggage.

User avatar
Wirelic
Posts: 28
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2018 10:11 am
Location: Green Bay, WI
Motorcycle: 1978 GL1000
1986 Suzuki Cavalcade
1977 Triumph 750 Bonneville
1978 GL1000 Goldwing
Previous: 1969 Honda CL450
1981 Yamaha Virago 920
1965 Honda 150
1967 Triumph Mountain Cub

Re: Restoration started

Post by Wirelic » Wed Aug 28, 2019 8:21 am

Yesterday I figured out a system that works for me in removing the clouded clear coat from the wheels. I was having no success, so I called Eastwood Industries and asked their recommendations. I was told, that since chemical strippers can no longer be made with methylene chloride there’s only one alternative- that’s to sand the clear coat off.

So, what I did was use driveway and concrete power washer concentrate made by Zip Industries, full strength. I dipped a corner of one of those green scrubbing pads into the Zip cleaner then scrubbed the heck out of the wheel. Then I wiped the wheel with a wet rag, then sanded it with 400 wet/dry sandpaper. After that, I buffed the wheel with Blue Magic Metal Polish. This resulted in a wheel that gleamed like new chrome. I’m pretty happy with the results. But I may sand again using progressively finer paper and then do another round of polishing. It’s a work in progress while learning. Below are pics of the wheel during the process. Prior to this, the old clear coat had turned the wheels a dull gray and ugly.
Attachments







Post Reply