Motorcycle difficulties


Information and questions on GL1000 Goldwings (1975-1979)
  • Sponsored Links
Post Reply
YourJere
Posts: 10
Joined: Sun Sep 08, 2019 8:29 pm
Location: Waller, Texas
Motorcycle: 1977 GL1000

Motorcycle difficulties

Post by YourJere » Sun Sep 08, 2019 10:06 pm



A few months ago I bought a 1977 Gl1000 with about 14,000 miles for $430, I am 17 and I wanted to get into motorcycles so I figured the best way was to buy and fix because I don't have enough to get a nice running one. When I saw the Goldwing I did some research that made me want to buy it and so far here is a list of what all I've spent so far on it off the top of my head
Motorcycle - $430
Battery - $60
Carb rebuild kit - $55
Front brake master cylinder - $20
Oil - $30
3 oil filters - $10
Timing belts - $30
Brake fluid - maybe $5
Petcock - $20
Total - around $660 or more since I'm probably forgetting something.

Which doesn't seem too bad until you consider what hasn't been bought yet
such as tires which should be around $200 I believe, also I need to rebuild my rear brake
and my tachometer doesn't work (cable spins but the needle doesn't move)
and my radiator fan doesn't spin.
But I haven't started on those smaller issues yet.

I've rebuilt my carbs and it sort of runs but it dies after about 30 seconds.
Basically, it starts whenever the fuel petcock is off and there isn't much fuel, then I put the fuel in the on position and it dies right when the fuel is pumped to the carbs but I rebuilt them weeks ago and it idled for a few minutes in the beginning https://www.instagram.com/p/B2FuTGsF6_m ... hare_sheet shows it running/idle so I believe the carbs just need to be cleaned again, but this also makes me consider waiting and sending it to pistol pete or something to make sure the carbs are working perfectly.
Usually with a fuel issue its hard to tell if its getting too much fuel or not enough so I took the fuel line off the fuel pumps output and held the start and it squirt fuel out about every pulse as it should, so the issue isn't as simple as the petcock or fuel filter (replaced fuel filter today anyways because visible rust particles from past tank clean) and I ordered the crappy fuel petcock from Saber cycles today because mine was broke.
Also the timing belts haven't been replaced yet, and the carbs are not synchronized yet.
I do not plan on running it anymore til they are replaced.



User avatar
2003Cobra
Posts: 34
Joined: Sat Aug 03, 2019 4:29 pm
Location: United States
Motorcycle: 2003 Goldwing GL1800 with a CSC Cobra trike kit.

Re: Motorcycle difficulties

Post by 2003Cobra » Mon Sep 09, 2019 11:17 am

Welcome YourJere, Do you have a service manual? You don't mention having one and that will give you the specs for setting up the carbs. I would first check and make sure the floats are working correctly and are set correctly. Then make sure low and high speed jets are clear and the rest of the carbs are clean. Also check the diagrams. Then set up each carb according to the service manual then sync the carbs. Once you have that done it should idle and run pretty good.

Have you changed out tires before? If not there are some good tips on here and also No-Mar has some great videos on how to change out MC tires of course using their changers and tools but they do give you a good visual on what needs to be done. Good luck and let us know how everything goes.
2003 Goldwing GL1800 with CSC Cobra trike kit.
1988 Harley Davidson Sportster 883 with Hypercharger Bobber.
West GA Chapter 89 Southern Cruisers riding club.

winguyjo
Posts: 180
Joined: Sat Aug 11, 2018 9:26 pm
Location: b.c. Canada
Motorcycle: wing1 : 1982 gl1100 interstate; resurrection complete.
wing2 : 1980 gl1100 interstate; resurrection complete. SOLD.
wing3 : 81 gl1100i frame / 82 gl1100a engine/ 81cb900 odds & ends; resurrection complete. it's naked. SOLD.

Re: Motorcycle difficulties

Post by winguyjo » Mon Sep 09, 2019 11:40 am

from the sound of it, your engine is telling you that it is getting too much fuel. so i would focus on float height and the fuel inlet needle and seat. since you have already taken them apart for a rebuild it should be easier the 2nd time around. don't worry about carb syncing just yet ... that is the very last step in a carb overhaul.

welcome to the forum ! lots of knowledgeable goldwing gurus here to help.

it may sound like the cost is piling up quickly but in doing your own work you will end up with a bike that you know, and in the end you will have a better product than buying a more expensive bike that likely would have a problem or 3 of it's own that weren't readily apparent during a pre-purchase inspection.

YourJere
Posts: 10
Joined: Sun Sep 08, 2019 8:29 pm
Location: Waller, Texas
Motorcycle: 1977 GL1000

Re: Motorcycle difficulties

Post by YourJere » Mon Sep 09, 2019 7:17 pm

winguyjo wrote:
Mon Sep 09, 2019 11:40 am
from the sound of it, your engine is telling you that it is getting too much fuel. so i would focus on float height and the fuel inlet needle and seat. since you have already taken them apart for a rebuild it should be easier the 2nd time around. don't worry about carb syncing just yet ... that is the very last step in a carb overhaul.

welcome to the forum ! lots of knowledgeable goldwing gurus here to help.

it may sound like the cost is piling up quickly but in doing your own work you will end up with a bike that you know, and in the end you will have a better product than buying a more expensive bike that likely would have a problem or 3 of it's own that weren't readily apparent during a pre-purchase inspection.
I did say it it would die quickly and I saiddd I wouldn't run it again until timing belts were replaced. But the other day I needed to take it out of my shop to make room while clearing it out a bit, and I decided to hook up a temporary fuel tank (a bottle with a fuel line shoved in it) and I actually drove the damn thing (for the first time) and it acted a lot differently, and it ran longer so I went about 100 ft, I hope the bike was lying to me originally with the carb issues because removing it is a huge hassle for me. That was also the first time I've driven a motorcycle ever.
If the issue persist I believe it only ran good because the fuel had to travel a lot farther and inconsistently, or the floats were stuck and shaking it around a bit loosened em up a bit, I never checked float levels when I rebuilt the carb, I just tested if air could pass through the holes so if I got to take the carbs off that't the best place to start.

User avatar
pidjones
Posts: 55
Joined: Sun Jun 03, 2012 2:14 pm
Location: Clinton, Tennessee
Motorcycle: 2006 GL1800A
1978 GL1000 w/'75 engine (project)

Re: Motorcycle difficulties

Post by pidjones » Tue Sep 10, 2019 6:12 am

There are many online articles on GL1000 carb rebuilds as well as videos. Float height setting and leak testing are two primary tasks in the rebuild process. Also, you will find that the remove/install process gets easier with experience and proper sequence. Here is a hint on leak checking: use 91% isopropyl alcohol instead of gasoline - less hazard, smell, and any left over will mix and burn.

YourJere
Posts: 10
Joined: Sun Sep 08, 2019 8:29 pm
Location: Waller, Texas
Motorcycle: 1977 GL1000

Re: Motorcycle difficulties

Post by YourJere » Thu Sep 12, 2019 4:48 am

2003Cobra wrote:
Mon Sep 09, 2019 11:17 am
Welcome YourJere, Do you have a service manual? You don't mention having one and that will give you the specs for setting up the carbs. I would first check and make sure the floats are working correctly and are set correctly. Then make sure low and high speed jets are clear and the rest of the carbs are clean. Also check the diagrams. Then set up each carb according to the service manual then sync the carbs. Once you have that done it should idle and run pretty good.

Have you changed out tires before? If not there are some good tips on here and also No-Mar has some great videos on how to change out MC tires of course using their changers and tools but they do give you a good visual on what needs to be done. Good luck and let us know how everything goes.
Sorry I never replied, I have a Haynes manual and, I recently tried to drive the bike and it immediately decided to run correctly, I will run again soon to see if the issue resolved itself like maybe a floatbowl was stuck, and I just replaced my timing belts so I need to get everything back together. My grandfather will buy me some tires/tubes and we'll take the rims to any local place to do it because it's too much of a hassle for me. Not much left on my checklist now
-Need tires
-Need to fix tach gauge
-make sure waterpump works
-figure out radiator fan issue
-rebuild back brake
guess I am almost done



Post Reply