Front Brake Pads uneven wear


Information and questions on GL1800 Goldwings (2001-2017)
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controlu
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Front Brake Pads uneven wear

Post by controlu »



I decided to check my front brake pads on a recently purchased '03 GL1800. (I call left and right sides as I'm sitting on the bike, looking forward.) I pulled the right side and found them worn way down. The outer pad actually showing some metal and the inner pad not that far gone but still thin. I pulled the left side (side with the antidive) and found them to still be within limits. My first thought was that someone only replaced one side somewhere along the line. However, could there be a problem with the system that only one side is truly working as it should?
On further investigation, is the antidive also called the delay valve? And, does the fact that it has a drilled out nickle in it affect this issue?



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GoldWingrGreg
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Re: Front Brake Pads uneven wear

Post by GoldWingrGreg »

Your Wing is a 5th gen (2001-17). 5th gens have an integrated braking system. When you pull on the front brake lever, the rear brake works to, and when applying the rear peddle, it applies both front and rear pads.

Hopefully someone will come along and post a picture that will help. But here is how the system works. Keep in mind that each caliper has 3 pucks. In each caliper, the top and bottom pucks work together, and the center puck works independent from the other two.

We also have a secondary master cylinder, that sits above and gets activated by a floating left caliper. Here is how that works. As the pads are applied on the LF, the spinning rotor shifts the caliper upwards activating the secondary m/c.

With all that, and in short, our system works like this. When the front lever is pulled, fluid pressure activates the RF upper and lower pucks, and the center LF puck. As the pads are applied the bike slows and on the left side the caliper pivots upwards on the secondary m/c pushing fluid to activate the rear pads also.

When using the rear peddle, the center RF puck is activated, both upper and lower pucks on the LF, and once again that caliper is lifted, fluid is pushed to the rear caliper and all 3 pucks are activated in the rear.

There is a delay valve in the system that even makes it more complicated then what I am describing.

As for your pad wear. Because our pads is very different from one caliper to the other, most replace pads as needed. In most cases, the LF wear fastest, followed by the RF, and then the rear. It sounds like your LF pads were more recently replaced because they wear the fastest.

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Viking
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Re: Front Brake Pads uneven wear

Post by Viking »

controlu wrote:
Sun May 17, 2020 1:43 pm
I decided to check my front brake pads on a recently purchased '03 GL1800. (I call left and right sides as I'm sitting on the bike, looking forward.) I pulled the right side and found them worn way down. The outer pad actually showing some metal and the inner pad not that far gone but still thin. I pulled the left side (side with the antidive) and found them to still be within limits. My first thought was that someone only replaced one side somewhere along the line. However, could there be a problem with the system that only one side is truly working as it should?
On further investigation, is the antidive also called the delay valve? And, does the fact that it has a drilled out nickle in it affect this issue?
The anti dive has been disabled with the drilled nickel. It should not affect the braking nor the pad wear. The only thing it would affect should be overly stiff suspension problems, and these it should eliminate. They also sell kits to do this. Some think that just cleaning the anti dive, to ensure proper operation is a better idea, but I disabled mine the first time the bike suspension locked up, and I have never regretted it.
It ain't about the destination - it's all about the journey

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controlu
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Location: S.W. Florida, U.S.A.
Motorcycle: 2003 GL1800 Goldwing / Trike Conversion

Re: Front Brake Pads uneven wear

Post by controlu »

I was unaware of the fact of front and rear working together, mostly because the bike has been triked. Would have been nice if I'd posted that in the first place but I didn't think it would matter since I thought the front and rear were independent, which they are now. So, I assume that since I'm only using the hand lever for the front brake, I'm also using mostly only the right front brake. Sorry that you posted that long and insightful reply as a result of my bad information.

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GoldWingrGreg
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Re: Front Brake Pads uneven wear

Post by GoldWingrGreg »

controlu wrote:
Mon May 18, 2020 7:44 am
I was unaware of the fact of front and rear working together, mostly because the bike has been triked. Would have been nice if I'd posted that in the first place but I didn't think it would matter since I thought the front and rear were independent, which they are now. So, I assume that since I'm only using the hand lever for the front brake, I'm also using mostly only the right front brake. Sorry that you posted that long and insightful reply as a result of my bad information.
Triked ... OH ... now that's a totally different story, and it all depends on what brand trike kit you have, how your kit was evolved over the years, and when your kit was installed. To be the first on the market, many early trike kits separated front and rear braking. As kits evolved, some went back to an integrated braking system.



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